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NAUTILUS 



1926 




FOREWORD 

How rich is he who holds fond recol- 
lections. Yetj how much more wealthy 
is he who has, as wellj a printed record of 
vivid experiences and cherished associ- 
ations. 

The purpose of this volume will be 
accomplished if 

You, student headbr, find your- 
self re-living the days spent at E.N.C.j if 

YOU, INTERESTED READER,/^/ that 

the curtain of the life within our Halls 
has been drawn back for you. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/nautilus1926unse 



T HE NAUTILUS 

VOLUME V 
19x6 




Published by 
The Students of Eastern Nazarene College 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



DEDICATION 

TO THOSE WHO HAVE GIVEN US 

OUR FIRST GLIMPSE OF THE SEA OF LIFE; 

TO THOSE WHO HAVE CHECKED 

OUR IMPETUOUS EAGERNESS TO SET OUT ALONE; 

TO THOSE WHO HAVE KEPT US 

NEAR THE HOME PORT UNTIL WE MASTERED 

THE INTRICACIES OF SAILING; 

TO THOSE WHO HAVE AIDED US 

TO FIND THE PILOT, WHO KNOWS 

EACH REEF AND SHOAL J 

TO 

OUR FATHERS AND MOTHERS 

WE GRATEFULLY DEDICATE THIS 
OUR FIFTH VOLUME OF THE 

NAUTILUS 




. ^rSi. 




If I could only understand 
The meaning of a baby's smile, 
The wistfulness of puppies' eyes, 
The singing of the little brook, 
The peace of meadow spreading far, 
The moaning of the wind-swept pines; 
The cloudy wall of falling snow, 
The misty stretch of cheerless fog, 
The waiting silence of the night, 
The poignant thrill of each new day, 
The grief and gladness of my friends, 
I should be Infinite, be God! 

L. m. d. c'2.6 



In each room, we heard 
The grave professor. 



A classic lecture, rich in sentiment, 

And quoted odes, and jewels five words long, 



then we dipt in all 
That treats of whatsoever is, the state, 
The total chronicles of man, the mind, 
The morals, something of the frame, the rock, 
The star, the bird, the fish, the shell, the flower, 
Electric, chemic laws, and all the rest, 
And whatsoever can be taught and known. 

TENNYSON 





On 

Our 
Campus 





"On old New England's rock-bound coast" 



The Chambered Nautilus 

Year after year beheld the silent toil 

That spread his lustrous coil; 

Still, as the spiral grew, 
He left the past year's dwelling for the new, 
Stole with soft step its shining archway through, 

Built up its idle door, 
Stretched in his last-found home, and knew the old no more. 

Thanks for the heavenly message brought by thee, 

Child of the wandering sea, 

Cast from her lap, forlorn ! 
From thy dead lips a clearer note is born 
Than ever Triton blew from wreathed horn ! 

While on mine ear it rings, 
Through the deep caves of thought I hear a voice that sings : — 

Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul, 

As the swift seasons roll ! 

Leave thy low- vaulted past ! 
Let each new temple, nobler than the last, 
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, 

Till thou at length art free, 
Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea! 

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES 




Previous Editors of The Nautilus 




HOWARD G. HERRSCHAFT, S.B. 
Editor of Nautilus 1911 



RUSSELL V. DeLONG, A.B. 
Editor or Nautilus 192.3, 1915 






DOROTHY WHITE LEAVITT, A.B. 
Editor of Nautilus 1914 



Nautilus Staff 





V -.1 ,, .J% 

.■i-:'i3.:* / - ■■ ■ .^ 



mm 





PERSONNEL 



Editor-in-Chief, Irva G. Phillips 
Associate Editor, Doris M. Gale Literary Revisor, V. Kent Goodnow 

Literary Editor, Lurla M. Dwinell College Life Editor, J. Wallace Ames 

Art Editor, Olive G. Tracy Associations Editor, Clarence J. Haas 

Alumni Representative, Alice Spangenberg Secretary, Dorothy P. Peavey 

Faculty Advisor, Effie S. Goozee 
Art Associate, Mary E. Jones Art Associate, Arthur W. Morse 



Nautilus Staff 




PERSONNEL 



Business Manager, Armond F. Rush 



Assistant Business Manager 
Wesley G. Angell 



Faculty Advisor, Karl L. Wildes 



Advertising Manager 
Chester A. Smith 



Advertising Associates 

Albert W. Smith 
Elwood M. Fuller 



Advertising Associates 

Alton G. Perkins 
H. Blair Ward 



Stenographer, Ruth I. Ede 



Table of Contents 

ADMINISTRATION 

COLLEGE 

ACADEMY 

THEOLOGICAL 

CAMPUS LIFE 

ADVERTISEMENTS AND 
SPRINKLED SPICE 




JtoMJJWSTfljiTJON 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 17 




PRESIDENT 
FLOYD W. NEASE, A.M., B.D. 

A.B., A.M. 

University of Southern California 
Maclay College of Theology 

B.D. 

Pasadena University 
Boston University 



Professor 

Philosophy and Religion 
Greek 



"Dispelling Fog 

The danger of the fog can never be exaggerated. The one unmitigated and unavoid- 
able danger of the deep it is, for beneath that velvet blanket lurk the most treacherous 
dangers against which even the high-powered searchlight and the most masterful 
seamanship are unavailing. 

But there are many kinds of fogs. Worse if possible than the one which shrouds the 
ocean highway is the moral, religious, and theological cloud which covers like the 
pall of death our educational and theological institutions. What jagged rocks, what 
treacherous bars, -what murderous surfs await the unwary student when he enters 
this atmosphere of irreligion and unbelief! 

For this reason we have Eastern Nazarene College, an institution where the per- 
vading influence is one of faith and Christian love, and where the smiling Sun of 
Righteousness dispels, by His beams of truth, the fog of unbelief and destructive criti- 
cism. Here the student receives instruction under professors who know Him and 
Jesus Christ whom He has sent. f. w. n. 



Page 1 8 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Faculty 





BERTHA MUNRO, A.M. 
English Language and Literature 

' ' A truer, nobler, trustier heart, 
More loving, or more loyal, never beat 
Within a human breast. 



R. WAYNE GARDNER, A.M. 

Mathematics and Science 

Truth is truth hoiue er it strikes. 





ERNEST E. ANGELL, S.T.L. 
Biblical History and Literature 

The greatest truths are simplest, and so are 
the greatest men . " 



EFFIE S. GOOZEE, A.M. 
Classical Languages 

'So ivomanly, so benigne, and so meke. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 19 



Faculty 





G. CLAIR COWDREY, A.M. 
History and Science 

"Sweet the memory is to me 

Of a land beyond the sea, 

Where the ivaves and the mountains meet. 



ETHEL WILSON, S.B. 
Education and Social Science 

"Thou hast the patience and the faith of 
Saints." 




MARY HARRIS, A.B. 

French and Spanish 

"None knew thee but to love thee, 
None named thee but to praise. 




ALICE SPANGENBERG, A.M. 
English 

"Cheerfulness is an offshoot of goodness and 
of ivisdom . ' ' 



Page zo 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Faculty 





KARL L.WILDES, M.S. 
Electricity 

"He is never alone ivho is accompanied by 
noble thoughts." 



CARRIE M. GARDNER, A.B. 
German and Sub-preparatory 

' 'And still be doing, never done. 





DORIS M. GALE, A. B. 
Vocal 

"Her every tone is music s oivn 
Like those of morning birds, 
And something more than melody 
Dwells ever in her ivords . 



VERA SEARS, B.MUS. 
Piano and Expression 

Music resembles poetry; in each 
Are nameless graces which no methods teach, 
And ivhich a master-hand alone can reach.' ' 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 
Faculty 



Page ii 




HAZEL HARDING 
Typewriting and Stenog- 
raphy 

"Do not delay; 
Do not delay; the golden 
moments fly." 




MRS. JOHN GOULD 
Dean of Women 

"In her duty -prompt at 

every call 
She watch 'd, and wept, and 

felt, and -pray 'd for all. 




MARGARET E. PATIN, A.B. 
Nurse 

' ' To pity distress is but 

human; 
To relieve it is Godlike. 




LOLA E.COWDREY, A.B. 

French 

" I feel within me 
A peace above all earthly dig- 
nities, 
A still and quiet conscience. 




MR. W. A. MILLETT 
Dean of Men 

Then on! Then on! where 
duty leads 
My course be onivard still. 



Page T-L 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Business Administration 




REV. JOHN GOULD 
Business Manager 

' 'A ioif s a feather, and a chief a rod, 
An honest man s the noblest work of God. 



It is true, some of us thought that 
we knew Brother Gould before he came 
to dwell among us as our Business 
Manager. Today, however, we who are 
privileged to belong to the 192.5-2.6 
Student Body know him in our hearts 
— if all have not the courage to speak — 
as ' 'Daddy Gould" . 

Progressive and yet conservative, he 
is following the precedent in keeping 
firm the business structure of our ad- 
ministration. 



Our administration section would 
seem incomplete without Brother Pea- 
vey. Those who see him every day tell us 
that he is always talking Eastern 
Nazarene College. We do not doubt this. 

The faculty members know that he 
will not only sign his name to their 
checks, but sign in spirit of cooperation 
all enterprising steps taken in the inter- 
est of Eastern Nazarene College. 




MR. LEROY D. PEAVEY 
Treasurer of Board of Trustees 

We are all gauged by what we are able to 
accomplish . ' ' 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page Z3 



Board of Trustees 



New England District 

Floyd W. Nease 
Leroy D. Peavey 
Howard V. Miller 
John Gould 

Neiv York District 

Paul Hill 

C. B. Jernigan 



Washington-Philadelphia District 

John T. Maybury 
Edward Slocum 



Pittsburgh District 

Dr. J. Howard Sloan 
Albert Welch 
H. B. Macrory 



Alumni Representative 
Charles J. Washburn 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Chairman, John Gould 
Vice-Chairman, Howard V. Miller 
Secretary, Charles J. Washburn 
Treasurer, Leroy D. Peavey 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 
John Gould Leroy D. Peavey 



Floyd W. Nease 



Charles J. Washburn 




, ,*-*'' "■<?" V'f^v 



Page 14 



The Nautilus 1026 



Lecturers 




EDWARD C. FULLER 

Commencement Address 

June io, 192.5 

The biggest thing in business is not ma- 
chinery, materials, or markets; but rather 
men. The biggest thing in men is not body , 
mind, or muscle; but soul." 

TOWSON 



REV. J. T. MAYBURY 

Superintendent of Washington- 
Philadelphia District — Church of the 

Nazarene 

"Our people everywhere rejoice that in these 
days of apostasy and scepticism we have a 
college in the East whose scholastic stand- 
ards are highly approvable and yet where the 
Bible, Christ, and the Holy Spirit are 
honored and a spiritual atmosphere per- 
vades the ivhole place.' ' 




The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 15 



Lecturers 




REV. C. W. RUTH 

Evangelist 

Revival Campaign, November 10-15, 
192.5 

Characteristic Wit 

' 'If silver dollars greiu on trees, we would all 
be up a tree; but silver dollars groiu only 
at the end of a hard day ' s ivork . ' ' 



DR.J.B. CHAPMAN 

Chairman of General Board of 
Education 
Church of the Nazarene 
Editor of Herald of Holiness 

"A person may have much knoivledge, but no 
person is wise who is outside of God' s will . 




Page 2.6 



T h e Nautilus 1926 



New England District Assembly 
April 21-2^ 1926 

HELD AT EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE 

Wollaston, Massachusetts 



REV. HOWARD V. MILLER 

Superintendent of New England 
District 

Church of the Nazarene 





DR. R. T. WILLIAMS 

General Superintendent 

Presiding Superintendent 

of New England 

District Assembly 1916 




• /''i< "i" ' v -*, . 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 Page x 7 




In Chapel 

September tsj — I believe that all things come to those who wait, providing they work 
like thunder while they are waiting. rev. g. e. Archibald 

October 6 — The GREATER THINGS that Christ told His disciples they should do 
are in the spiritual realm, because the spiritual is greater than the physical by far. 

REV. O.J. NEASE 

October 9 — If you want to catch fish that are worth while, you will have to go out 
where the water is deep. REV LUM JONES 

October 15 — Nautilus Picture Day. "Obedience is better than sacrifice and to 
hearken than the fat of rams." president f. w. nease 

December i — The three essentials to success are faith, courage, and "stickability . 

DR. H. F. REYNOLDS 

January 13 — A man can be negatively good and positively no good. 

REV. E. E. MARTIN 



Page 2.8 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



College Song for E. N. C 



God planted thee, we dare to boast, 

E.N.C.,dearE.N.C, 

On old New England's rock-bound coast, 

E.N.C.,dearE.N.C. 

Oh, ne'er forget the trust He gave! 

"My laborers, falter not, be brave; 

For I've a world for thee to save, 

E.N.C.,MyE.N.C." 



11 

Then on our campus let God dwell, 
E.N.C.,ourE.N.C. 

Within our halls His praises tell, 
E.N. C, our E.N. C. 
We'll do thy bidding without fear; 
We'll send thy message far and near, 
And span His world with heaven's cheer, 
E. N.C.,dearE.N.C. 



in 

True sons and daughters on the field, 

E.N.C.,Oh,E.N.C, 

A deathless covenant have sealed, 

E.N.C.,Oh,E.N.C. 

They pledged thee with a purpose just 

Thy standard ne'er to trail in dust. 

They'll save God's world and keep thy trust, 

E. N.C., God's E.N.C. 

M. NEASE 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 2.9 



College of Liberal Arts 

BERTHA MUNRO, A.M., Dean of Department 




STUDENT OFFICERS 

President, Clarence J. Haas 
Vice-President, Arthur W. Morse 
Secretary, Dorothy P. Peavey 
Treasurer, Armond F. Rush 






Page 30 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Interview 

Student and Dean of College Department 



"What is the purpose of a college education?" 

' 'I think its chief aim should be to prepare young people to take their places among 
those who serve and lead. If it does not do this, it is in part a failure." 

' 'How does it do this ?" 

"A college education tends to make the mind, the emotions, the will, the most 
efficient servants possible. It should train the intellect and store the mind with facts 
related for future use, direct the emotions into proper channels, educate the will to 
mastery over all the complex situations which may arise in life. ' ' 

"Who should have a college education?" 

"Every one who can possibly have one, for the general broadening in outlook on 
life it will give. A high-school education is good, but it doesn't go far enough. He is 
inexcusable who neglects an opportunity for a college education." 

"What place has religion in a college education?" 

"In the formative soul-shaking college days it gives the student a fixed center in 
God. It gives true standards of evaluating facts, regulating emotions, and forming 
decisions; it keeps the developed human faculties submitted to divine guidance and 
control." 







The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 31 



College Senior Class 

Motto: Nil Nisi Cruce 
Colors: Garnet and Silver 
Flower: Rose 



OFFICERS 

President, Irva G. Phillips 
Vice-President, Doris M. Gale 
Secretary, Lurla M. Dwinell 
Treasurer, Margaret E. Patin 



I am a part of all that I have met; 
Yet all experience is an arch where thro' 
Gleams that untravell ' d ivorld to hose margin jades 
For ever and for ever when I move. 

TENNYSON 



Page 32. 



The Nautilus 1926 




IRVA 
GRACE PHILLIPS, A.B. 

Manchester, New Hampshire 

'All -people said she had authority.' 
' There is no fettering of authority . ' 

Secretary of Nautilus' 2.4; Secretary of 
Evangelistic Association '2.4; President 
of Young People's Society '14; Vice- 
President of College Department '2.5; 
Associate Editor of Nautilus '2.5; Secre- 
tary of Student Organization '2.5; 
Editor of Nautilus 'i6. 



^rti 



Depend ableness and dependence are traits in Irva's character. How can this para- 
dox be? She is to be relied on absolutely. None could be more true. And doubtless she 
would tell you this is because of her absolute dependence on God. Irva, as editor of 
the Nautilus, is doing a big work this year. May she ever be as true and faithful in her 
work! May God bless her as she goes from E. N. C. to a wider sphere of usefulness, 
and make her a blessing. Amen. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 33 



DORIS 
MILDRED GALE, A.B. 

Lowell, Massachusetts 



'Music is ivell said to be the 
speech of angels." 



Treasurer of Missionary Society 'Z3; 
Secretary of Breseean Literary Society 
'14; Chairman of Social Committee '15 ; 
Associations Editor of Nautilus 'Z5; 
President of Evangelistic Association 
'2.5; Director of Chorus '2.6; Associate 
Editor of Nautilus '2.6. 




Doris carries with her all the vivacity of a summer's storm. She puts life into any 
undertaking in which she is interested. She contributes positively to college life. 
Hers is not a negative personality. And now, after her apprenticeship in college, she is 
going out into life, prepared to meet its difficulties and fight its battles and come out 
on top. And as she goes, may the blessing of God go with her, and may she be to 
others a blessing and help and encouragement. 



Page 34 



The Nautilus 1926 




LURLA 
MYRA DWINELL, A.B. 

Hard wick, Vermont 



'Mantling on the maiden s cheek 
Young roses kindled into 
thought. 

Breseean Program Committee '14, 
'2.5; Art Associate of Nautilus 'xy, 
Secretary of Y. W. A. A. '2.5; Literary 
Associate of Nautilus 'ty Literary 
Editor of Nautilus 'x6. 



Always cheery is Lurla. Exams never worry her. Hard lessons do not disturb her 
equilibrium. Early or late, she is never flurried. A language student, a worker, an 
enthusiastic Vermonter — Oh, how much that tells. She is leaving. And as she goes 
may the blessing of God be upon her, "which maketh rich and addeth no sorrow". 
May she find her place in the great plan of God, and fill that place as she is capable of 
filling it. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 3; 



MARGARET 
ELEANOR PATIN, A.B. 

Uhrichsville, Ohio 

' The blessing of her quiet life 
Veil on us like the dew. 



Vice-President of Breseean Literary 
Society '14; College Nurse; Secretary 
of Missionary Society '2.4; Secretary of 
Young People's Society '2.4; Student 
Monitor of CollegeDorirntory '2.5, '2.6; 
Vice-President of Student Body '2.6. 




Four years now Margaret has been at the college. She will be missed when she 
leaves. Her smiling face and shining hair have become familiar landmarks on the 
campus. She has dosed the indiscreet, indulged the indisposed, performed all the 
multitudinous duties of a nurse, — and done them cheerfully. God grant His richest 
blessing upon her as she leaves for her chosen field — Africa. May she be as great a 
blessing there as she has been at E. N. C. 



Page 36 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



College Chatter 

Two girls chatting gayly strolled down the driveway, crossed the lawn, and sat 
down near one of the iris beds. Their conversation drifted into something like this. 

"It seems so strange that another year has slipped by, and another Senior Class is 
graduating. And especially these girls! Why, I remember when Doris first came to 
school. It was the second year the school was here and she took a business course. ' ' 

"Yes, and she used to sing at recitals. I always think of her as standing by the 
grand piano, dressed in white, with her hair gleaming. She was wonderful! And she 
was always among the first to go skating, or on a hike, or to the tennis courts. It was 
last year, wasn't it, that she was president of the Evangelistic Association, and 
didn't Russell DeLong and Sam Young make life unbearable for her?" 

"I was surprised when I found out that she was going to be vocal teacher this year, 
but she has been very successful, hasn't she?" 

"She certainly has ! Do you think she has ever forgotten that little black notebook 
of hers? I have seen her look at it in class, and jot down notes in chapel. I don't see 
how she ever finds time to manage all her students, classes, and trips to Boston." 

"Doris has surely been getting training for her future work. She can sing, play, 
preach; and a few days ago I saw her take down the outline of a sermon to give to 
Russell." 

"Yes, Doris will be of great help to him in his evangelistic work. ' ' 

"I wonder who we will have for nurse next year. Margaret has been 'it' for so 
long. I think she deserves a lot of credit. Every one is sick at the same time. Margaret 
is good fun. I love to watch her smile. ' ' 

"I do, too, and she is always so sweet and patient. I think she and Bill are a perfect 
contrast — 'Red and Black'. I like to see them together." 

"You know Margaret has her hands full as monitor over at the College House. 
Of course, we girls haven't been very lively this year, but remember the excitement 
when Dot Goodnow, Arline, Freda and Ethelyn were here? We would have driven 
anyone else crazy, but we all loved Margaret so much that she couldn't be very 
cross." 

"She is going to be a missionary to Africa, isn't she? She's had plenty of training in 
managing people here. She has a quality of firmness, beneath her sweetness, hasn't 
she?" 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 37 



' 'We'll miss Lurla, too. She has been here six years, I think. 

' 'Yes, the first two years she was usually under discipline, but she has been popular 
always with the fun-loving students. She is invariably in the midst of any excite- 
ment." 

"She has been on so many programs — either singing, or giving readings. Do you 
remember that German one? The boys have called her 'Katrina' ever since. And that 
wonderful Indian reading last June, with Professor Benner's accompaniment." 

"Wasn't it fun this year when Lurla was head of the snap-shot contest, and the 
boys lost, and had to feed the girls molasses kisses?" 

"It certainly was. What's she going to do next year?" 

"I guess she's going to Florida with her father. You know she has taken her 
college course in three years, and earned nearly all of her own expenses, and she says 
she deserves a vacation. Then she's going to Emerson College and take up short- 
story writing and some courses in dramatic art." 

"That's good. She seems especially fitted for that. What are we going to do with- 
out Irva? There has never been any one here so energetic, so efficient as she. We've all 
depended on her to get us interested in any student project. ' ' 

"I know. Irva has that gift of arousing enthusiasm in others. I'll never forget the 
Nautilus subscription contest last year. Irva made us win. She has been pretty busy 
this year, being the editor of the Nautilus, and doesn't she work at Hilliard's?" 

"Yes, and did you know that for the last three years she has been helping many of 
the churches and missions around Boston? She has addressed missionary societies, and 
talked at Young People's Rallies. Nearly every week she has been in some meeting." 

"I'd love to see her when she goes to Africa. I'm sure she'll never lose that en- 
thusiasm and vim, and that is what wins people. ' ' 

"We're going to miss our Seniors. Every one of them is a leader in some phase of 
school life." 

"Each graduating class brings us that feeling of loss, I guess, but we must take up 
their responsibilities and 'carry on'." 

l. m. d. c'2.6 



Page 38 



The Nautilus 1926 



College Juniors 




CLARENCE J. HAAS Haverhill, Massachusetts 

' 'An honest man he is and hates the slime 
That sticks on filthy deeds. 

President of College Department; President of Band; President of 
Junior Class; Vice-President of Missionary Society; Associations 
Editor of Nautilus; Treasurer of B. L. S. (First Semester); Teacher of 
Cornet; Orchestra. 



ARTHUR W.MORSE 



Plattsburg, New York 



"Whate'er he did ivas done with so much ease, 
In him alone ' tivas natural to ■please." 

President of B. L. S. (Second Semester); Associate Art Editor of 
Nautilus. 



MARIE L. SLOAN 



East Liverpool, Ohio 



True, conscious honor is to feel no sin; 
She ' s armed without that' s innocent within.' ' 

President of Y. W. A. A.; President of Classical Club; Secretary 
and Treasurer of Junior Class; Secretary of Amphictyon Council. 



V. KENT GOODNOW W. Danville, Vermont 

"Peace rules the day, ivhere reason rules the mind. 

Literary Revisor of Nautilus; President of Debating Club; Chair- 
man Program Committee B. L. S. 







The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 39 



College Juniors 



DALPH W. FRY New Galilee, Pennsylvania 

"No duty could overtask him, 
No need his will outrun. 

Chairman Social Committee; Assistant Fire Chief; Orchestra; 
Band. 



JOHN WALLACE AMES Bowdoinham, Maine 

' 'Bright as the sun his eyes the gazers strike, 
And, like the sun, they shine on all alike.' ' 

President of B. L. S. (First Semester); President of Evangelistic 
Association; President of Student Council; College Life Editor of 
Nautilus. 



RUTH ACKERMAN, Derry, New Hampshire 

' 'My favored temple is an humble heart. 



STANLEY MIROYIANNIS 



Metelin, Greece 



"When a lady ' s in the case, all the other things give 
-place." 




Page 40 



The Nautilus 1926 




College Sophomores 



SAMUEL YOUNG 



Cleveland, Ohio 



' 'And tho' I hope not hence unscath ' d to go, 
Who conquers me, shall find a stubborn foe ." 

Chorister of Church; President of Sophomore Class; Basket Ball 
Team (College). 



EDITH A. ANGELL Wollaston, Massachusetts 

"A day for toil, an hour for sport, 
But for a friend life is too short. 

Vice-President of Sophomore Class; Vice-President of Classical 
Club; Secretary of Palmer Math, and Science Club; Pianist of Y. P. S.; 
Assistant Treasurer of Missionary Society; Chorus. 



ARMOND F . RUSH Mannington, W . Virginia 

"Master, go on, and I will follow thee 
To the last gasp, with truth and loyalty.' ' 

Business Manager of Nautilus; Treasurer of Student Body. 



DOROTHY P. PEAVEY 

Watertown, Massachusetts 

' 'Attempt the end, and never stand to doubt, 
Nothing's so hard, but search will find it out." 

Secretary of Nautilus Staff; Secretary of College Department; 
Secretary of Sophomore Class; Vice-President of Y. W. A. A.; 
Vice-President of B. L. S. (First Semester); Orchestra. 



J. WILLIS ANDERSON Warren, Pennsylvania 

' ' Of all our parts, the eyes express 
The sweetest kind of bashfulness." 

Treasurer of Evangelistic Association; Chaplain of B. L. S. (First 
Semester); Pianist of Church; Orchestra; Band. 



-., "\. 



<T h 



Nautilus 1926 



Page 41 



College Sophomores 



WESLEY G. ANGELL 

Wollaston, Massachusetts 

There's a brave felloiv! There' s a man of -pluck! 
A man who ' s not afraid to say his say, 
Though a whole turn s against him.' ' 

Associate Business Manager of Nautilus; Secretary of Student 
Council; Basket Ball Team (College). 

GEORGE A. ROGERS 

Benton, New Brunswick 

"Other hope had he none, nor wish in life, but to follow 
Meekly, ivith reverent steps, the sacred feet of his 
Savior." 

Vice-President of Evangelistic Association. 

MARGARET W. BROWN 

Beverly, Massachusetts 
"Give me a look, give me a face, 
That makes simplicity a grace.' ' 

Secretary of Missionary Society; Secretary of Sunday School; 
Vice-President of Palmer Math, and Science Club; Vice-President of 
B. L. S. (Second Semester). 

MARTHA L. TRACY Hartford, Connecticut 

"Tome more dear, congenial to my heart, 
One native charm, than all the gloss of art. 

Corresponding Secretary of Missionary Society; Vice-President of 
Y. P. S.; Chorus. 

THOMAS B . GREENE Newport, Rhode Island 
"hive to explain thy doctrine by thy life." 

Pastor of West Somerville Nazarene Church. 

ARTHUR W. GWYNN 

ROSLINDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

' ' I dare do all that may become a man; 
Who dares do more is none. 




Page 42. 



The Nautilus 1926 



College Freshmen 



Whc 



H. Blair Ward, East Palestine, Ohio 
Albert G. Lunn, Lowell, Mass. 
Jessie L. Angilly, Providence, R. I. 
Thomas M. Brown, Beverly, Mass. 
Edward S. Mann, Waterville, Vt. 



CLASS DIRECTORY 

What 

Executive 

Musician 

Quaker 

Comedian 

Uke Player 



Lois A. Burgess, Cambridge, Mass. 
Elsie C. Gatherer, Cleveland, Ohio 
Florence E. Hand, Morristown, Pa. 
Jesse S. Richardson, Wollaston, Mass. 
Paul A. Lunn, Lowell, Mass. 

Helen E. Gilbert, Lisbon, Ohio 
Benjamin W. Dobson, Lynn, Mass. 

Sewell G. Hilyard, Fort Fairfield, Me. 
Grace DeSalvo, Spring Valley, N. Y. 
Helen E.Johnson, Wollaston, Mass. 
Helen L. Traudt, Highland Falls, N.Y. 
Frank H. Bowers, Jr., Providence, R. I. 
John Riley, Providence, R. I. 

Mary E.Jones, Bethesda, Ohio 
Olive G. Tracy, Hartford, Conn. 



Charles E. Deware, Providence, R. I. Joker 



Optimist 

Dignitarian 

Efficient 

Reliable 

Toiler 



How 

Ever growing — up and out. 

Fingers made for the piano. 

"Silence! Shf" 

He must have his fun. 

From morn 'till night 
His uke ivorked right. 

Happy am I, from care I'm free. 

That ' s not the way to do it. ' ' 

Small of stature, big of heart. 

A man s a man for all o' that. 

Our todays and yesterdays 
Are the blocks with which we 
build. 



Energy 


I love everybody. 


Tailor 


A stitch noiv and then is safest 
for all men. 


Maine (iac) 


As steady as the sun. 


Songstress 


Kind and ' 'merry . ' ' 


Balance 


Free, light, yet stern was she. 


Reserve 


Up and at it when 'tis needed. 


Psychologist 


host — in the fog. 


Adventurer 


Heights and depths are his to 
know. 


Elocutionist 


She sways them as she wilt. 


Artist 


A ready hand and a willing 



mind. 
The spice of the class is he. 



T h e Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 43 



College Freshmen 




WARD LUNN ANGILLY BROWN 

MANN BURGESS GATHERER HAND RICHARDSON 

LUNN GILBERT DOBSON 

HILYARD DESALVO JOHNSON TRAUDT BOWERS 

RILEY JONES TRACY DEWARE 



Page 44 



The Nautilus 1926 



Modesty 

In the early summer as I was walking along a country path, a beautiful fragrance 
was borne to me. I turned aside and found a patch of lilies of the valley. I stooped and 
picked one of the flowers. As I looked at its drooping head the thought immediately 
flashed through my mind, "How modest you are." I looked again, and I realized 
that there was more than a drooping head in the modesty of the flower. I observed it 
was white, as white as the driven snow. I looked inside, and there saw a little circle of 
green, which spoke of its life and freshness. The head was looking down toward the 
ground, yet inside that little head were stamens tipped with gold. It had a glory all 
its own not seen by every passer-by. 

As I looked at the purity, the freshness, and the gold within I could not refrain 
from exclaiming, like Archimedes of old, "I have found it! I have found it!" The 
secret of true modesty lies within. 

e. c. g. c'19 



Moods 

On sunny days 

My glad heart leaps 

And throws its arms out wide 

Embracing all the earth and sky. 

It sings a song 

Of warmth and life 

A hymn of joy for youth 

For youth and joyful freedom. 

On rainy days 

lam happy, too. 

I love the rain-drops' fairy feet. 

I watch them dance 

On the pavement gray 

And tumble in swiftly-gathering pools. 

Then when they stop 

My heart cries out 

At the beauty of a rain-swept world ! 

l. m. d. c'i6 







The Nautilus 1926 



Page 45 



A TLainy Day in the Blue Hills 

It was a rainy day. The drops fell constantly, wavering a little in the gusts of wind. 
On the wet pavements they struck, dancing up and down like dainty little fairies or 
mischievous elves. They huddled together in little pools, or chased each other down 
rivulets into the gutters. A few of them lingered in depressions in the pavement, and 
for their reward were covered with a coat of oil from the tar, glowing, sparkling in 
a thousand rainbows in the brilliant sunlight, which shone for a moment or two and 
then receded again behind the misty clouds. 

On the long, graceful leaves of the chestnut trees pattered the drops. Some struck 
smartly on the broad side of the leaf, others rolled silently off and nestled in the 
dainty pink and white blossoms. The weeping willows drooped their heads still 
lower and tried to hide the tears that fell ceaselessly. The birch trees held their 
branches and leaves proudly still as if fearful to lose the crystal majesty enveloping 
them. The tiny spears of grass lifted their freshly-washed heads and smiled cheery 
green smiles at the welcome little drops. On a little bush glistened an exquisite bit of 
nature's handiwork — a filagree effect of diamonds and silver. True, it was only a 
spider's web covered with raindrops, but for a moment it was transformed into a 
vision of fairyland. 

The little brook, always impetuous, was now hurling itself headlong down the 
side of the road, rejoicing wildly in the number of little rivulets that joined its ranks. 
A few weeds were pulled from their places and were swirled along on their unforeseen 
journey. A large, green Luna moth hung perilously on the under side of a leaf over- 
hanging the brook, his long, green tails trailing down dejectedly. 

On the whole, it was the kind of rainy day that is usually welcome — the kind that 
leaves the grass and flowers brilliant in their freshly washed colors. And when the 
sun finally came out and all the merry little drops glistened and scampered away, the 
world shook itself and started life anew with fresh beauty, and clean, rain-swept air. 

l. m. d. c'z6 



I meet students going to and from classes. 

Some are preoccupied and give me a curt nod: 

Others pass disdainfully by. 

One faculty member smiles, absent-mindedly, 

But my best friend gives me a handshake and a cheery word 

And brightens all my day! 

l. m. d. c'2-6 



Page 46 



The Nautilus 1926 



Great Impossibilities Wrapped Up in the College Department 

What if: 
Willis Anderson should rival Demosthenes. 
Edith Angell should drop her "Virgil". 
WesleyAngell should worry. 
Jessie Angilly should become "Riley" d. 
John Ames should keep silence in the College Library. 
Ruth Ackerman should elope. 
Lois Burgess should lose her curling iron. 
Margaret Brown should flunk a test. 
Tom Brown should lose a "Foote". 
Frank Bowers should never say "Huh". 
Eddie Deware should become an undertaker. 
Lurla Dwinell should retire before midnight. 
Grace DeSalvo should forget to sing. 
Ben Dobson should miss a "press"ing engagement. 
Dalph Frye should happen to scorch. 
Doris Gale should fail to "rustle a-Long". 
Kent Goodnow should forget to study. 
Tom Greene should lack a new thought. 
Arthur Gwynn should get excited. 
Elsie Gatherer should change her mind. 
Clarence Haas should succumb to discouragement. 
Florence Hand should put her foot in it. 
Sewell Hilyard should use slang. 
Helen Johnson should forget her books. 
Mary Jones should stop raving in her sleep. 
Albert Lunn should spend a week-end at E. N. C. 
Paul Lunn should translate Greek without an explanation. 
Arthur Morse should get up for breakfast. 
Eddie Mann should major in Latin. 
Miroyiannis should concentrate for ten minutes. 
Dorothy Peavey should be a politician. 
Irva Phillips shouldn't hear her "Alarm". 
Margaret Pa tin should dye her hair. 
Armond Rush should forget his pocket-comb. 
George Rogers should be free from care. 
Jesse Richardson came to class on time. 
Marie Sloan should get the rheumatism. 
Martha Tracy should be an old maid. 
Olive Tracy should never work overtime. 
Helen Traudt should get the lock-jaw. 
Blair Ward should use stilts. 
Sam Young should get "Peave'd". 



The Nautilus 1926 Page 47 



Trivia 

THE OCEAN 

Some people seek rest in a quiet, shady spot under a tree, some seek it on the open 
highway, others on the hill top; but let me find the ocean. On a summer's day it rolls 
in at my feet in little ripples. On a cold, bleak November morning the wind lashes the 
waves and they break in white foam on the rocks, sending the spray over me as I 
look on. 

Oh, who has fathomed your depths? Who has been able to withstand your mighty 
attacks? I am convinced that what I see in you is not all there is of you. Back of your 
placid waters, back of your mighty strength, I feel, deep within my soul, there is a 
Being, a God somewhere, who controls your moods, and whose word can bid you be 
still. 

I have looked, I have thought, I am rested. Your Creator is my Creator. I am going 

back to rely on that strong arm which holds you in check, and be led by the hand 

which measures you. 

7 e. c. g. c 2.9 

JUST FUN 

Did you ever see anything more energetic than a group of boys? Look at them on the 
corner lot today, playing football! They have no helmets; they have no need of 
"padding" — in fact, their whole attire is the same as when they trudged to school 
this morning. And yet — their appearance is changed somewhat. Look at "Shorty" 
with his coat off, and with sleeves rolled up! "Mike" is there, too, with his clumsy 
arms and big feet. The " nice boy" of the crowd has had an accident to his trousers, 
but he plays on though somewhat abashed. "Fatty" is puffing. Oh, they are all 
there — the "gang." 

Signals — "One, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, thirty-one!" cries the young captain. 
They're off. "Speedy" gets it, but "Mike" gets him. Down they come! The rest pile 
on top of the struggling pair. After the usual scramble, "Mike" is seen sprawled on 
top of the ball, crying "I got it." What does it all mean? Just fun. 

s. y. c'2.8 

SMOKE 

Have you watched the thin wisps of smoke as they shot straight from the chimney 
and were lost in the invisible ethereal realm; or have you watched as they hovered 
over the bosom of mother earth, hiding everything beautiful from our view? How 
much like our thoughts, which many times soar high and are lost in God's great 
infinite realm; and again they cling to earth obscuring our vision. 

c. r. h. th.'z6 



Page 48 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Our Master and the Sea 

Walking one day by the sea, Jesus saw Peter and Andrew fishing. ' 'Follow me, ' ' said 
he, "and I will make you fishers of men." And straightway they forsook their nets 
and followed him. James and John responded in like manner to a similar invitation. 
It was thus that our Master recruited his dearest followers. 

Often Christ resorted to the seashore. When the crowds pressed, and the Lord was 
weary, to the seaside he would go, and, sitting there or in a boat a little removed 
from the shore, he would talk of the things his listeners needed to know. 

One night Jesus was crossing the Sea of Galilee. He himself, wearied, was asleep 
on a pillow in the back part of the boat. What reason he had to be wearied! A great 
storm arose. The ship filled with water. Jesus slept on. His disciples awoke him. 
' 'Master, how can you sleep so? Do you not care that we perish?' ' they asked. 

Up rose the Lord of the seas. "Peace, be still!" said he, and the wind ceased and 
there was a great calm. And his disciples said, "What man is this, that the wind and 
the sea obey him!" 

Once again there was a storm on the sea. The disciples were out in their small boat, 
rowing to bring it to land, the wind being contrary. Jesus had remained behind on the 
mountain to pray. About dawn he appeared to his disciples, walking on the water. 
They were frightened, thinking him a spirit until he reassured them with his com- 
forting "It is I; be not afraid!" 

Then Peter, impetuous as ever, started out on the water to meet his Master. Very 
well — as long as he kept his eyes on Christ. But the waves were boisterous — surging 
up and down. He looked at them — he feared — he began to sink. "Lord! Save me!" 
he cried. And Jesus put forth his hand and caught him, and they went together to the 
ship. And when they reached the ship the wind ceased; and immediately they were at 
the land whither they were going. 

Our Master loved the sea. Often he resorted thither. How it must have rested him, 
as it has rested many a weary soul since, with its solitude, its vastness, its grandeur. 
And how comforting is the thought that, even as Christ stilled the troubled seas in 
days of yore, so he does today quiet the seas of strife which rage about us, or raise us 
above them, if we but let him, to walk with him in paths of peace! 

K. G. c'2.7 

Thou glorious mirror, 

where the Almighty' s form 
Glasses itself in tempest; 



boundless, endless, and sublime — 
The image of eternity , the throne 
Of the Invisible. 

BYRON 




AZAAZMY 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 49 



Academy Department ■ 

R. WAYNE GARDNER, A.M., Dean of Department 




STUDENT OFFICERS 



President, Ernest J. Myatt 
Vice-President, Virgil M. Hoover 



Secretary, Ruth I. Ede 
Treasurer, Edna D. Foote 







Page 50 



The Nautilus 1926 



Interview 

Student and Dean of Academy Department 



"Do you think the Academy student at Eastern Nazarene College does as thor- 
ough work as the average High School student?" 

"Yes and more thorough, for the student in the average High School when he is 
through with classes separates himself from school activities. Here the atmosphere 
at all times is conducive to study, and the student is in constant touch with his 
work. 

"In the next place he has here the advantage of studying with teachers who have 
qualifications for College instruction." 

"Are there any advantages for a student to enter the Academy for his last year 
or two of preparation before entering College?" 

"Yes, from two standpoints: first, from the Scholastic. Our Academy Depart- 
ment has as one of its aims a thorough preparation for College. Ordinarily the 
transition from High School to College proves to be a serious matter with many 
students, and is oftentimes disastrous. By entering the Academy which is closely 
affiliated with the College, one makes this transition more easily. 

"Second, from the Spiritual. I presume the greatest problem of young people 
is to maintain a true standard of Christianity in the face of the challenging conditions 
of worldliness. Here the student in the crucial period of his life can build a stalwart 
Christian character unhampered by those conditions." 

"Should a student, called to the ministry, complete an Academy course before 
taking his final theological preparation?" 

"Under normal conditions most certainly he should. The ministry is worthy of 
the most thorough preparation of all professions. Men demand much of one who 
ministers to their eternal souls. A short route to the ministry is belittling the 
call of God. The Academy offers the necessary foundation for adequate preparation." 



T h e Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 51 



Academy Senior Class 



Motto: Finis Coronat Opus 
Flower: White Rose 



OFFICERS 

President, Virgil Hoover 
Vice-President, Alton Perkins 
Secretary, Edna Foote 
Treasurer, Hazel Allen 



CLASS ROLL 



Hazel Marjorie Allen 
Ruth Isabel Ede 
Edna Daten Foote 
Dorothy Emma Fuller 
Estelle May Gardner 
Virgil Meritt Hoover 
Louis Franklin Michelson 



Ernest James Myatt 
Sadie Estelle Peavey 
Alton Gilford Perkins 
Helen Maxwell Pillsbury 
Anna Meta Siegmann 
Helen Marion Stebbins 
James Young 



Let knowledge grow from more to more, 
But more of reverence in us dwell; 
That mind and soul, according well, 

May make one music as before. 



TENNYSON 







wm w JMzA 




Page 5i 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Senior Class 




VIRGIL MERITT HOOVER 
Olivet, Illinois 

"7 knoiu no such thing as genius — genius is 
nothing but labor and diligence. 

President of Senior Class; President of Y.M.A.A.; President of 
Amphictyon Council; Captain Academy Basket-ball Team; 
Fire Squad. 

Future Occupation: Undecided 



ALTON GILFORD PERKINS 

Lynn, Massachusetts 

The most manifest sign of Wisdom is 
continuous cheerfulness . ' ' 

Vice-President Senior Class; Nautilus Staff; Y.M.A.A. Coun- 
cil; Basket-ball Team; Chorus 

Future Occupation: Christian worker 



HAZEL MARJORIE ALLEN 
Wolcott, Vermont 

"For she is nothing if not -persevering. 

Treasurer of Senior Class 

Future Occupation: Teacher 



EDNA DATEN FOOTE 
Wollaston, Massachusetts 

"A cheery word, a kindly smile, a girl that' s 
friendly all the while.' ' 

Secretary Senior Class; Secretary A.L.S. 'z6; Treasurer of 
Orchestra; Treasurer of Academy Department 

Future Occupation: Teacher 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 53 



Senior Class ^xtZ^'T^^t^.t+a^ 




ANNA META SIEGMANN 
Richmond Hill, New York 

"Her smile is sweetened by 
her gravity." 

Chorus Fire Squad 



ERNEST JAMES MY ATT 

Oxford, Nova Scotia 

' 'Not for good deeds, but 

for good alone." 

President Athenian Literary Society '15; 
Treasurer Missionary Society; President 
Academy Department; Chorus, Student 
Council 



HELEN L< H/^ 

MARION STEBBINS 4-. 

$4C' 



!& 



Syracuse, New York 
"A kind heart is a fountain of 
gladness, making everything in 4H****? 
its vicinity freshen into smiles. ' ^26 

Secretary of Y.W. A. A. '1 '-'■£■ 



/«:* 



Future Occupation: Undecided Future Occupation: Missionary Future Occupation: Undecided «^ 



t 



RUTH ISABEL EDE 
Cleveland, Ohio 

"Nothing is impossible to a willing heart." 

Secretary of Academy Department; Orchestra; Secretary of 
Young People's Society; Secretary of Evangelistic Association 

^tor^Occ^^^'ow/Home-MissionsWorker 



ESTELLE MAY GARDNER 
Warren, Pennsylvania 

"Happy thoughts, playful wit and 
laughter. 

Secretary A. L.S. '15; Tennis Club 

Future Occupation: Undecided 



^ 



Page 54 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Senior Class 




SADIE ESTELLE PEAVEY 
Lynn, Massachusetts 

"To be happy is an art jew 
acquire." 

Treasurer A.L.S. '2.5; Chorus 

Future Occupation: Teacher 



JAMES YOUNG 

Cleveland, Ohio 

"For wise he is, if I can judge 

of him. And true he is, as he 

has proved himself. 

Fire Chief; Student Council; Y. M. A. A. 
Council; Academy Basket-ball Team; Ten- 
nis Club 

Future Occupation: Preacher 



DOROTHY 

EMMA FULLER 

Brooklyn, New York 

"Her pleasant smile ivas only 
surpassed by her sweet voice." 

Treasurer of Chorus; Tennis Club; Fire 
Squad 

Future Occupation: 
Christian worker 



LOUIS FRANKLIN MICHELSON 

Waverley, Massachusetts 
The ivise and active conquer difficulties by 
daring to attempt them.' ' 

Vice-President of A.L.S. '2.6; Tennis Club, Academy Basket- 
ball Team. 

Future Occupation: Undecided 



HELEN MAXWELL PILLSBURY 
Haverhill, Massachusetts 
"Her ivords like so many nimble and airy 
servitors trip about her at command. 

Orchestra 

Future Occupation: Teacher of Expression 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 55 



In Loving Memory of 




"Chet" 
CHESTER ALLEN ANGELL 



Born, September z, 1909 



Died, June ix, 19x5 



Sunset and evening star, 

And one clear call for me! 

And may there be no moaning of the bar 
When I put out to sea. 

Tivilight and evening bell 
And after that the dark 



And may there be no sadness of fareivell 

When I embark. 
For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place 

The flood may bear me far, 
I hope to see my Pilot face to face, 

When I have crost the bar. 



To some, the Master gives the spirit of Cheerfulness, the spirit that enlivens and 
brightens the life of others. As one of these, Chester will live always in our memo- 
ries. 

In our hearts there is to-day sadness and gladness; sadness, because we miss him 
sorely; gladness, because the "clear call" meant for him the joy of meeting his 
Pilot "face to face." 



Page 56 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Academy Senior Digest 



VIRGIL M. HOOVER 
It has not been long since "Virgil" came to E.N.C., but he is very popular. His 
mischievous blue eyes may have something to do with this, especially among the 
girls. Nevertheless Virgil has proved his efficiency on the gym floor and in student 
activities. 

ALTON G. PERKINS 

"Al" is one of the bright lights of the Dining Hall. His frank, open good-nature 
has won us all. He is an earnest Christian, a hard worker, and a steady friend. "Al" 
is usually much concerned about his English, and we hope that it will always fasci- 
nate him as much as it has through his last High School years. 

HAZEL M. ALLEN 

Four years ago "Hazel" left the Vermont Hills and came to school. Her warm- 
hearted, impulsive nature has won her many friends, and her staunch loyalty to 
those she likes has cemented further these bonds of friendship. We shall miss her 
next year, unless she decides to come back to us for her College course. 

EDNA D. FOOTE 

"Eddie" is one who creates friendliness wherever she goes. She is a twentieth- 
century girl, yet there is a touch of old-fashioned sweetness about her. In the dor- 
mitory with her uke, in chapel with her violin, at recitals with her readings, she is 
one of our most popular lassies. 

ANNA M. SIEGMANN 

"Anna" came to us this year, and has won a unique place among us. She has en- 
tertained us by her readings and interested us in her class discussions. She is plump, 
full of fun, and an excellent cook. Her favorite color is "red". 

ERNEST J. MY ATT 

We used to think that "Ernest" was quiet, but we have watched his participation 
in student activities, and now we would say quiet but efficient. Some day he will 
work for the Master in other lands, yet we feel that that will be only a continuation 
of the Christ-like spirit he has shown at E.N.C. 

HELEN M. STEBBINS 

To be called a loyal friend is to be given one of the finest compliments in our 
language. "Helen" is a loyal friend. True-hearted, good natured, with always a 
willingness to oblige, is our classmate. She can make even the battered piano in the 
gym talk, and higher praise is there none. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 Page 57 



Academy Senior Digest 
ruth 1. EDE 

Busy people always have the most time. It seems as though "Ruth" is always 
busy at school work, or at Hilliards, or in typing manuscripts. She has begun al- 
ready her future career, and is a great blessing in the work of the Evangelistic 
Association. 

ESTELLE M. GARDNER 

"Stella May" came this year, and we owe another debt to Warren. She is usually 
bubbling over with laughter, and her good spirits are infectious. Underneath and 
through her playfulness is a vein of true sweetness. She is every one's friend. 

SADIE E. PEAVEY 

"Sadie" is apparently a quiet Miss, but under that sober exterior is a heart ready 
for fun and laughter. Many are the times that the walls of the kitchen have resounded 
with her outbursts of mirth. We hope she will come back next year. 

JAMES YOUNG 

James Young is an all-round man. He can play basket-ball, and he can paper 
walls. He is another one of the bright lights of the Dining Hall, and is of inesti- 
mable service in the office. "James" is Chief of our famous Fire Squad. 

DOROTHY E. FULLER 

"Dot" is another of our New Yorkers. She is slender, dark-eyed, and impulsive. 
It is with pleasure that we hear her sing or play. ' 'Dot" is very much interested in the 
theological part of the curriculum, and we prophesy that that interest will continue 
throughout her life. 

LOUIS F. MICHELSON 

"Mickey" has been with us for two years, and this year has quite changed our 
first estimate of him. Besides his interest in athletics and radio he has a brotherly 
concern for the younger boys of the Manchester. He is a true friend and a loyal 
classmate. 

HELEN M. PILLSBURY 

"Betty" is sunny-haired and blue-eyed. She is interested in athletics and ex- 
pression, and she is good at both. In Lit or at Hilliard's she has put her best into 
whatever was given her to do. "Betty" is a good comrade. 



Page 58 



The Nautilus 1926 






W* 



Junior Class 




YOUNG, DAVIS, LOEFFLER, FOOTE, STEARNS 
DICKEY, RALPH, BELMONT, JEFFERY, KUNZE, DEWARE 

President, Dorothy Jeffery 
Vice-President, John Dickey 
Secretary, Ruth Belmont 
Treasurer, Donna Ralph 

Motto: Courage Sans Peur 
Floiver: Black-eyed Susan 
Colors: Canary and Cerise 



TO BE OR NOT TO BE 



Ruth Belmont 
Marion Davis 
Stanley Deware 
Victor Dickey 
Olive Foote 
Dorothy Jeffery 
Naomi Kunze 
Paul Loeffler 
Donna Ralph 
Gerald Stearns 
Nathalie Young 



An old maid 

A college professor 

Ever "Reddy" 

A debater 

Quiet 

A "Perc-" onified wife 

A Hairdresser 

A "preacher" 

A model housewife 

Never stern 

Forever "Young" 




■lite'; j& 



N A U T I L U /V/ 9 2 6 



Sophomore ffkzs's 



-*S3> — 



Page 59 




FULLER, HUDSON, DUNNING, RICH, PARK 
WHITE, ALLEN, KNUTSON, SAITER, DOBSON 

President, Joseph Knutson 
Vice-President, David Dobson 
Secretary, Dorothea Allen 
Treasurer, Ernest White 

Motto: Qui Non Proficit, Deficit 
Flower: Yellow Rose 
Colors: Blue and Gold 



Service be our motto, 
Obedience to our God, 
Vatience be our virtue, 
Weaven our reivard. 
Onward ever striving, 
Moving toivard our goals, 
Opening doors to gladness, 
Releasing doivncast souls . 
E. N. C. is calling, 
Sophomores , obey! 

c. H. M. 



Page 60 




The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Freshman Class 




PROUTY, BROWN, GOTT, DEWITT, OLIVER, ALEXANDER 
OLSON, WAYLES, MACCALLUM, TURKINGTON, DEWARE, LORREY 

President, Nelson MacCallum 
Vice-President, Ruth Wayles 
Secretary, Marjorie Deware 
Treasurer, William Turkington 

Motto: Labor Omnia Vincit 

Flower: Pansy 

Colors: Purple and Gold 

A president of a college once replied to a father inquiring for a short course for his 
son to pursue, "A pumpkin can grow in three months, but an oak requires years." 

A Freshman may be likened to an acorn planted in the ground. When it is planted 
one might think that its usefulness was ended — of no value to anyone — gone. But 
wait a minute — usefulness is brought out by the principle of paradox. A seed must 
die to bring forth fruit; a life must be lost that it may be gained; a student must be 
hidden away in school that he may be useful in time to come. 

When the sun's rays get warmer the seed begins to shoot forth its fresh, green head. 
After the first few months we begin to show that we are interested in the world about 
us — begin to show life — begin to develop and grow. We are green, to be sure, but just 
watch us through the remaining school years. See how we enlarge our stem and take 
on the hues of brown and gray as we advance. Yes ! it takes more than three months 
for us to grow to maturity. We are seeking to become oaks — to be of benefit to the 
world — to do something of real value for the Master. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 61 



Sub-Preparatory Department 




RIVERS, WAYLES, OLIVER, DIAZ, MCALLEN, YEO 
WANER, STUART, ANGELL, DIAZ, STANFORD, MACKINNAN 



President, Elvin Angell 
Vice-President, Laevina Gay 
Secretary and Treasurer, David Diaz 

We are only a small group among the students, but we are by no means the least. 
We are here in the furnace of preparation that our gold may be refined. We cannot 
shirk, for we know that all metal must be tried with fervent heat before the genuine 
beauty of it can be found and made ready for use. The white heat is powerful; it 
penetrates to the very center of our character; it burns out some things that seem to be 
true and allows others to remain untouched. Sometimes it seems that all we have 
considered worthwhile proves to be false, but as our Refiner opens the door and looks 
in, He sees there is something in us, some nugget of pure gold to be refined. Then He 
puts on a little more coal, a few more difficulties, intensifying the heat. When every- 
thing is most discouraging, when our souls seem to be torn from us, then are we taken 
out to be used of Him. Not a particle of the false can be found and the Master com- 
mends us and sends us out to work in His vineyard. 

This is the reason that we are at E. N. C. We must be tried before we go forth from 
this furnace of preparation to make our offering of righteousness unto Him. Then, as 
we meet our problems, we can rely on the experiences we have received here, and 
thank God that He put us where the fire refined. 



Page 62. 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



By a Master Hand 

The master artist was at work. The scene of a few hours before was rapidly chang- 
ing. Mud-covered bottoms of small boats were righting themselves, and one by one 
they slipped safely out of sight in the water. An occasional yacht unfurled its snow- 
white sail in the breeze and flapped its way toward the open sea. Higher and higher 
rose the water until the slime and filth of the bay were covered, and the span of water 
was surrounded in a semicircle by a light brown sandy shore. The Master had 
painted a beautiful picture. "The tide was in" at Wollaston Beach. 

j. y. a 2.6 

Summer in the Woods 

It was summer in the woods and nothing seemed idle. All the birds were chirping and 
a locust buzzed intermittently. In the middle of our path a badly mannered squirrel 
sat and chatted saucily. But he was away with a whisk. Nearby, a patch of blueberries 
attracted us, and it was not long before they were bouncing into our tin pails. As we 
resumed our walks a pretty butterfly flitted gracefully by us and lighted on a wild 
rose, only to be scared away by a couple of careless old grasshoppers who were mixed 
up in playing a game of tag. We were very hungry and had only started to eat our 
berries when there was a sudden ' 'Caw, caw, caw!" from above, and as we looked up, 
several crows were flying near us. We turned homeward reluctantly as the chirping of 
the busy little crickets, and the setting sun as it peeked through the green trees, 
reminded us that night was not far away. 

N. Y. A'Z7 



Audio 

There are many sounds that I like to hear — the rumble of my Ford when it is running 
well, the whistle of the train after I have been waiting some time, the weird, ghost- 
like whistle of the wind through the pine trees at night. I also like to listen to the 
patter of the rain on a tin roof, the singing of a teakettle, the crackling of a wood 
fire, the sweet vibrant notes of a piano. But there are sounds too that I love — that 
"Well, son" which my father very often says; my little brother, asking, "Chet, have 
you got any gum?" and the voice of my mother when she calls. 

c. a. s. th '18 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 63 



Academy Eccentricities 

Why does : 

Percy Alexander take life so easy? 

Dorothea Allen not like to be called Dorothy? 

Hazel Allen have so little time for leisure? 

Elvin Angell act so un-angelic? 

Ruth Belmont remind us of Lawrence? 

Ruth Brown appear to be so shrinking? 

Marion Davis wear glasses so seldom? 

Beulah DeWitt keep study hours so well? 

David Diaz talk so much? 

Ulda Diaz seem so peaceful and quiet? 

Victor Dickey boast of Washington, D. C? 

Marjorie Deware go home so frequently? 

Stanley Deware obey the library rules? 

David Dobson think himself a thinking man? 

Millicent Downs aspire to lofty heights? 

Evelyn Dunning never seek prominence? 

Ruth Ede keep so sweet? 

Edna Foote progress so rapidly? 

Olive Foote behave so well at all times? 

Dorothy Fuller regard Chet so highly? 

Elwood Fuller have so many excuses? 

Stella Gardner show her real nature? 

Laevina Gay assert her happiness? 

Virgil Hoover like to have an Angell near? 

Ruth Hudson laugh so vociferously? 

Dorothy Jeffery sing so sweetly? 

Joseph Knutson gravitate to the kitchen? 

Naomi (Kunze) cling to Ruth (Middleton)? 

Paul Loeffler look down on small folk? 

Grace Lorrey put nutmeg in apple pies? 

William Martin encourage the Professors? 



Page 64 



The Nautilus 1926 



Academy Eccentricities 

Why does: 

Louis Michelson wax so philosophical? 

Ernest Myatt call at the Nautilus room? 

Nelson MacCallum inspire zeal and determination? 

Lawrence McAllen blush so easily? 

Edna Oliver affect such deep sobriety? 

Georgie Oliver cause so little trouble? 

Hedvig Olson conquer the insurmountable? 

Ross Park prefer firing to church attendance? 

Sadie Peavey disregard environment? 

Alton Perkins like English and Music? 

Helen Pillsbury act so childish? 

Clyde Prouty get such good marks? 

Howard Randall tolerate such persecution? 

Ruth Rich disagree with the evident facts? 

Harold Rivers assume such skepticism? 

Anna Siegmann ask so many questions? 

Gerald Stearns overdo "certainly" and "truly"? 

Helen Stebbins whistle at the entrance to the Cardboard Palace? 

Anna Waner fail to get notoriety? 

Joseph Wayles dissipate his artistry? 

Ruth Wayles thrive on E. N. C. -pabulum 1 . 

Ernest White persist in being so noisy? 

James Young wish to insist on courtesy? 

Nathalie Young say she is still Young? 

Edward Pilling run on a single track? 

Ruth Middleton oscillate? 

Vera Smith attract attention? 

Alfred Churchill attribute a natural cause to all, sundry, and divers phenomena? 

Ella Strickland never run down? 




wm\tn 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 65 



Theological Department 

E. E. ANGELL, S. T. L., Dean of Department 




STUDENT OFFICERS 

President, Albert Smith 
Vice-President, Joshua Wagner 
Secretary and Treasurer, Fred Koehler 



Page 66 The Nautilus i 9 2 6 

Interview 

Student and Dean of Theological Department 



"What is the greatest problem of the Church today?" 

"The greatest problem is the lack of religious authority caused by a general re- 
jection of supernatural revelation found in the Bible, and found through personal 
relationship with the Holy Spirit." 

' 'Why is it more the problem of today than of previous years?' ' 

"Never until recent years has there been a special attack, from within the Church 
itself, upon the Bible as the supreme authority in matters of doctrine and religious 
experience. Heretofore such attacks have been from the outside. The great schism 
(known as Modernism) has developed through the influence of schools and colleges 
that have trained many preachers and prominent laymen to reject all authority but 
that of the human intellect. God the Father and Jesus Christ are brought before the 
Court of Human Intelligence and judged as incompetent to guide the Christian 
Church, by the Holy Spirit, through the inspiration of Scripture, or through personal 
revelation." 

"What is the solution to this problem?" 

"A strong insistence that any rejection of the absolute authority of Jesus Christ in 
the matters of religious experience or doctrine, is not Christian. An uncompromising 
position must be taken by every true Christian believer against the tolerance of 
membership in the Church of any who reject a supernatural revelation. This attitude 
should be taken in that gentle, yet firm spirit that would be characteristic of Jesus if 
He were in our place. Christianity has its boundaries of faith and practice. These are 
wide enough for all who wish to be Christians in the sense of making Christ their 
absolute authority in religious matters. Any that do not wish to do so are inconsist- 
ent in remaining in the Christian Church and in accepting their living through her 
treasuries. The only safety for the Church is to thoroughly purge herself of all that is 
not Christian in teaching and in practice. ' ' 

"What is our Theological Department doing to solve this problem?" 

"The Theological Department of Eastern Nazarene College refuses to accept 
theory that in any way rejects the idea of a supernatural revelation, or questions the 
authority of Jesus Christ to teach the absolute ideal in ethics and doctrine. Our 
department insists that if Theology is to be Christian there must be an authority 
higher than the human intellect, and that authority must be Jesus Christ, the very 
Son of God, co-equal, co-eternal, and con-substantial with God the Father." 







The Nautilus 1926 



Page 67 



Theological Enrolment 



Roy Bowers 
Ray Hagerman 
David Jenkins 
Bertha Klaiss 
Fred Koehler 
Daniel MacDonald 
Everett Mayo 
Albert Smith 
Chester Smith 
Joshua Wagner 



beauty of holiness, 

Of self-forgetfulness, of lowliness! 

power of meekness, 

Whose very gentleness and weakness 

Are like the yielding, but irresistible air! 

LONGFELLOW 



Page 68 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Theological Graduates 




BERTHA KLAISS 

Three years' work at E.N.C., with the help of previous work at Cincinnati Bible School, qualify 
Miss Klaiss for her diploma in theology. 

Born in Germany, but having lived in America for some years, she plans eventually to return to her 
homeland as a missionary, a home-missionary, to her own people. 

Hers is a quiet life. She comes and goes without much ado. Her pleasing German accentuation is 
delightful to hear. Her life is a testimony, an "offering of sweet savour unto the Lord". 

"Think truly, and thy thought 
Shall the world' s famine feed; 
Speak truly, and each word of thine 
Shall be a fruitful seed; 
Live truly, and thy life shall be 
A great and noble creed. 

With Miss Klaiss it is so; her words are true, her thoughts are true, her life is true. May she be a real 
blessing as she goes out into the world to witness for her Divine Lord. 

C. RAY HAGERMAN 

In September, 1919, Bro. C. Ray Hagerman first appeared on the campus of E.N.C. as a student. 
Starting at the very bottom, in the Sub-Preparatory Department, he has worked his way up the 
educational ladder round by round until now he is receiving his theological diploma. 
> A year in Sub-Prep. , a year in the Academy, a year outside of school as pastor of a Canadian Church, 
and three years in the Theological Department — this is a brief history of the last six years of Brother 
Hagerman's life. 

The call of God to preach His Word has been a dominant factor in shaping Brother Hagerman's 
career. He has been faithful to that call. His ruling passion is to be "saturated with the glory of God", 
not merely for his own satisfaction and enjoyment, but that others may see God in him, and be drawn 
thereby to God. 

May his labors be fruitful, we pray, as he goes forth into the vineyard of the Lord, where the harvest 
is ripe and laborers few. 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 69 



Thoughts on Truth 

Search for the truth is the noblest occupation of man; its -publication, a duty . madame de stael 

Truth is, in its entirety, absolute, complete, unchanging. Jesus said, "I am .... the Truth . . . ." 
Son of God, Himself God, perfect, "the same yesterday and today and forever", — variability, change, 
and inconstancy are incompatible with His character. A perfect God cannot become more perfect. Truth, 
in its essence, cannot become more or less true. It is as changeless as God Himself. Final truth is God. 

Man has always sought truth. The same force which draws him toward God pulls him toward truth. 
Finite man can never know truth, however, save relatively and in part. Only when the finite has been 
left behind, and the rescued soul of man goes out into eternity, can absolute knowledge of truth be 
obtained. Then "we shall know as we are known." "We shall see Him (the Truth) as He 
(the Truth) is." 

It is well that man's knowledge of truth can be no more than relative. He would be God could he 
know all truth. His progress would be at an end. He would have nothing to strive for, nothing to 
attain. An all wise God has created man a progressive creature. Up to the heights — "higher still and 
higher" — or down to the depths — ever goes the soul of man. He who seeks truth will find it. It will 
grow on him, expand, light the way before him. He who rejects truth, refuses to seek it, will go into 
denser, deeper darkness. It is a basal law of truth. 

No man knows truth absolutely. No two men see truth in every detail alike. No group of men have 
all truth. He only who approaches truth as a learner, with open heart and ready mind, can expect to be 
rewarded with a knowledge of truth. 

Even in the religious realm knowledge of truth can be only partial. Noiv "we know in part." We 
may grasp the basic, fundamental principles of God, of salvation, of eternity. But can we ever, as 
mortal men, comprehend these truths in their vast entirety? Will we ever cease gaining new ideas, fresh 
comprehensions — will we ever cease having enlargement of vision — in the realm of spiritual truths? 
God help us if we do ! 

And it is not enough to see truth. It is our duty to publish it abroad. Let us, before God, as we see 
the truth, give it to the world ! k. g. c'i.j 




BIBLE STUDENTS 







Page 7 o The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Theological Pleasantry 

' 'Again for this food we give thanks to Thee, 
Is the oft spoken gratitude of friend Roy B. 

"I'm saturated through and through today." 
Yes, we recognise this as Brother C. Ray. 

' 'Now I mean this, folks, in faith I do, 
Asserts little David, known as Jenkins, too. 

"I know my heart is right 'cause I'm walking in de light. 
This from Bertha Klaiss, our German Miss so bright. 

"I covet the best for you young -people here, 
Says F. W. Koehler, the wise old seer. 

That's a cardinal point as sure as you live.' ' 
Just a sifting from Everett Mayo's sieve. 

"lean ' t see it that way, ' ' in theology class 
We hear McDonald say, so on we pass. 

Note Albert Smith, the president large, 

Who of Young People' s meetings is often in charge; 

And Chester Smith, Al's roommate and chum, 
Who for Fuller enjoyment did long since succumb. 

And last but not least is Joshua 

He was ' 'bach' ' for awhile, but now is astray. 

Ten theologians tried and true 

We predict great things for this loyal few . 

Strive on ever faithfully setting the pace, 

Till at last you have triumphed, having won the race. 



Cup Winners 

Is there a contest in progress! Well, on which side are the "Theologs" ! That crowd 
stands a good chance of winning! It is the way they go at it! This is a common con- 
clusion in the minds of E. N. C. students respecting the Theological Department. 

No group can be accredited with more zeal or enthusiasm in any enterprise which 
affects the interests and progress of Eastern Nazarene College. 

In the 19x5 Student-get-Student Campaign they upheld their reputation and won 
from the Academy — the 19x5 winners — the cup awarded by the Administration to 
the Department whose members influence directly the largest number of new students, 
per capita. Congratulations, Theologs! 

s< VX . 




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Page 71 



Special Students 

Reba Miller 
Millicent Downs 
Jessie Hilliard 
Floris Sevigny 

Herbert Spencer has written that had a man time to master all subjects he need not 
be particular. To quote an old song: 

' 'Could a man be secure 

That his deeds ivould endure 

As of old, for a thousand long years, 

What things might he knoivl 

What deeds might he do! 

And all without hurrying and care." 

"But we that have but span-long lives must ever bear in mind our limited time for 
acquisition." 

LATE REGISTRANTS 

Ruth Middleton 
Harold Mohr 



SECOND SEMESTER REGISTRANTS 

George Chard 
Alfred Churchill 
Ruth Fess 
Earl Holt 
William Park 
William Sloan 
Vera Smith 
Ella Strickland 

According to the report given by our President from the Chapel platform the 
registration for the Second Semester of the school year 19x5-19x6 shows the largest 
total of any second semester registration in the history of the Institution. 



Page 7Z 



The Nautilus 1926 



Alumni 




PENTECOSTAL COLLEGIATE 
INSTITUTE 

North Scituate, Rhode Island 

(1900-1919) 



Alma Mater 



EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE 

Wollaston, Massachusetts 
(1919-19-) 




ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Have you ever thought of your old classmate — that one you used to have long talks 
and pillow fights with — and wondered where he was and what he was doing? And 
have you thought, too, of your old school and of the graduates it has been producing 
— whether they were making good and what place in the world they were filling? 
In an effort to answer inquiries of this sort, questionnaires were distributed among 
our members, and most of them answered enthusiastically. While the lists are not 
complete, the following are the results: 



T h e Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 73 



PREACHERS 
C. P. Lampher, Portland, Me.; Wilfred Burch, Stratford, N.J.; Frank Cubit, 
Ausable Forks, N.Y.; Daniel French, Everett, Mass.; Almer Gallup, Danielson, 
Conn.; Hattie Goodrich, Chicamuxen Circuit, Md.; Ray Haas, Keene, N. H.; 
Ephraim Wordsworth, Minneapolis, Minn. ; Clyde Sumner, Mooers, N. Y. ; Charles 
Washburn, Springfield, Mass.; Elmer Anderson, Eagle Rock, Calif.; Hervey 
Brown, Clintondale, N. Y. ; P. L. Cosman, Spring Hill, N.S. ; Louis Greene, Lincoln, 
Maine; Chas. Goldberg, Patchogue, N.Y.; Thomas Greene, W. Somerville, Mass. 
Freda Hayford, Montgomery, Vt.; Ernest Johnson, Pasadena, Calif.; David 
Keeler, Ogdensburg, N.Y.; George LaFlash, Haverhill, Mass.; Jonas Sulston, 
Snoqualmie, Wash.; Edward Silverbrand, Flushing, N.Y.; Warren Turpel, P.E.I. 
George Young, Wolcott, Vt.; W. A. Millett, Wollaston, Mass.; Louis Reid, 
Long Beach, Calif.; Dwight Archibald; Esther Haskard; Howard Edie; Louis 
Keeler; E. G. Williams; Ernest Drummond; Leon Alley; E. T. Lord, District 
Superintendent of North Pacific District; Howard Stahl, Hollywood, Md.; Harold 
Gardner, New Berlin, N.Y. 

MISSIONARIES 

Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Tracy, India; Agnes Gardner, India; Mr. and Mrs. Osborne, 
China; Mr. and Mrs. Paul Thatcher, Japan; Alice Sterritt, Mrs. Lewis Brown 
(Susie Durfee); Myrtle Pelley; I. F. Kierstead, Africa. 

TEACHERS 
Vladimir Dimitroff, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.; Mrs. Wayne 
Gardner, Wollaston, Mass.; Annie Archibald, Kingfield High School, Me.; 
Carroll Durfee, Taylor University, Upland, Ind.; Mrs. H. Durfee (Janet Shep- 
herd), Bethany, Okla.; Mrs. Flora Coate, Pasadena College, Calif.; Lewis Ondis 
(Ciuccio), DeMotte School, Norwalk, Conn.; Beatrice MacKenney, Primary 
School, Revere, Mass.; Alma Schuman, Primary School, New Bedford, Mass.; 
Olive Winchester, Northwest Nazarene College, Nampa, Idaho; Hazel Harding, 
Wollaston, Mass.; Laura Sutton, Principal of High School, Blessing, Texas.; 
Edwin Rush, Junior High School, Newtonville, Mass. ; Nettie Dexter, N. Scituate, 
R.I.; Ruth Weaver, Mahaffey, Pa.; Edith White, Greene, R.I.; Dorothea Mc- 
Laughlin, Besse High School, Albion, Me.; Samuel McLaughlin, Principal Besse 
High School, Albion, Me.; Mrs. Granville Gelatt (Ruth Haskard), Principal of 
Grammar School, West Auburn, Mass.; Mrs. Georgia Bailey, Merrimack School, 
Groveland, Mass.; Edith Peirce, Taylor University, Upland, Ind.; Alice Spangen- 
berg, Wollaston, Mass.; Howard Herrschaft, Junior High School, Longmeadow, 
Mass. 

NURSES 
Ethel Eager, Bridgeport, Conn.; Evelyn Morgan, Brooklyn, Mass.; Hazel 
Smith, Boston, Mass. ; Ruth White, Spring Valley, N.Y. ; Vida Kratz, Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; Ruth Rollins, Everett, Mass. ; Elizabeth Smith, Flint, Mich. 







Page 74 The Nautilus i g 2 6 



BUSINESS 

The following work in offices or banks : 

Leon Roy, Lisbon, N.Y.; Gordon Keeler, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Margaret Cald- 
well, Hartford, Conn.; Jennie Larrabee, Lowell, Mass.; Drewry Bower, Nor- 
folk, Va.; Helen Hamilton, Hartford, Conn.; Mrs. J. C. Ruel (Hazel Smith), 
Lakeport, N.H. ; I. French, Boston, Mass. 

The salesmen are: 

Fletcher Chilton, Marion, O.; Byron Smith, Brockton, Mass.; Herbert Brig- 
ham, Cambridge, Mass.; Mr. James Brown; Edith Cochrane, Essex Junction, Vt.; 
Ernest Doepel. 

W. R. Knight, hardware business, Greenville, R.I.; Harry Ingersoll, feed store, 
Stamford, Conn. ; Leonard Wonnacott, insurance broker, New York City; Stephen 
Chapman, storekeeper, N. Scituate, R.I. ; Leon Brown, storemanager, Danielson, 
Conn. ; Joy Hutman. 

STUDENTS 
Twenty-five of our Alumni are completing their education in Eastern Nazarene 
College and elsewhere. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Julia R. Gibson, doctor, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Willis B. Parsons, dentist, Scituate, 
Mass.; Arthur Doty, jewelry manufacturer, Attleboro, Mass.; Pedro Tourinho, 
East Wareham Bleachery, Mass.; Martin Insco, maintenance department of New 
York Telephone Co., New York City; Alice Henson, fancy presser, Altadena, Calif.; 
Anna French, librarian of Shaw University, Raleigh, N.C.; Harold Harding, 
newspaper reporter, Maiden, Mass.; F.H.Leavitt, electrician, Kittery, Me.; Everett 
Becker, floriculturist, Bedford Hills, N.Y.; Forrest Brown, farmer, N. Scituate, 
R.I. ; Lewis Boss, electrician, N. Scituate, R.I. ; Alvin Durfee, surveyor, N. Scituate, 
R.I.; Leon Fitch, farmer, Chepachet, R.I.; Travis Phaup, printer; Albert Ruth, 
social worker, Lawrence, Mass.; A. Reynolds, undertaker, N.H.; Harold Stewart, 
farmer, N. Scituate, R.I.; Gideon Waterman, farmer, Johnston, R.I.; Grube 
Cornish, Secretary State Board of Charities, Augusta, Me. 

We found, too, from the questionnaires the following interesting facts: 

Our students are now located in twenty-two states and in five foreign countries. 

They are engaged in twenty-eight different trades or professions. 

Since graduating, they have attended forty-five different schools or colleges. 

RECENT ALUMNI NEWS 

After being Dean and Vice-President of Pasadena College for five years, Louis 
Reid has taken the pastorate of the Nazarene Church at Long Beach, California. 

Vladimir Dimitroff received recently the degree of Doctor of Science from John 
Hopkins University. Now he is Austin Teaching Fellow at the Harvard Medical 
School. He is also doing research in the field of bacteriology. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 75 



Rev. and Mrs. L. S. Tracy, Rev. and Mrs. Paul Thatcher, Rev. and Mrs. I. F. 
Kierstead, and Agnes Gardner, all missionaries, are home on furlough. 

The following were married recently : 

Ruth MacIntosh and Edwin Rush, Mildred Belmont and John Poole, Evelyn 
Allen and William Herrschaft, Alice Nace and David Keeler. 

Jean Wilma Leavitt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. Harris Leavitt, has joined our 
cradle roll department. Pedro Tourinho has a young son. I 

ALUMNI TRIBUTES 

Old P.C.I, was the making of me. Brother Angell guided me safely through the 
troubled waters of adolescence. I would have been a lost sinner if it had not been for 
my Mother and my Alma Mater. Of all our schools, I love her best. louis a reid 



We look back upon the old P.C.I, days with much pleasure, for it was there that 
we first learned to "go through with the Lord." 



LEIGHTON S. TRACY 



Dear old P.C.I, has previous memories. It has meant more to me than tongue can 
tell 

uci1, E. E. WORDSWORTH 

God bless our school! I owe much, very much, to the Christian education received 
there 

" 1C t- JULIA R. GIBSON 

Eastern Nazarene College has not only given me the basis for a thorough education, 
but she has also won me wholly to Christ. She is worthy of the best we can give her. 

WILLIAM ESSELSTYN 

Highest words of commendation are none too good for my dear old Alma Mater. 

HATTIE E. GOODRICH 

The increase of my usefulness in the service of God, because of my years at E.N.C., 
must be reckoned, not by units, but by the hundreds. freda a hayford 



No one is happier than Alumni members to hear that things are progressing so well 
at the College. We are rooting for a bigger and better E.N.C. 

HOWARD G. HERRSCHAFT 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 
Attention, Alumni ! You are every one urged to attend our annual Alumni Day at 
the College on June it. Come prepared to transact business, to play off the 
College last year's tie of ix-iz in baseball, and then to enjoy a banquet. 



Page 76 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



When We Are Alumni 




A Chain of golden links — our school days. Links — dull and bright. Dull links — the 
long hours of midnight study, the hurried preparation for examinations, the routine 
work of school life. 

Bright links, outshining the others — the burnished links of blessed chapel services, 
the merry hours in Lit and gym, the brighter side of class and dormitory life. 

The clasp is that of warm comradeship, holding and binding the chain together, 
and it is this chain and clasp which will entwine itself around all our memories — 
when we are Alumni. 

l. m. d. c '2.6 





IMPU3 urs 



Th 



Nautilus 1926 



Page 77 



Students 
Organisation 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

'President 

John W. Ames 

Vice-President 

Margaret E. Patin 

Secretary 

Wesley G. Angell 

Treasurer 

Armond F. Rush 

Serge ant- at- Arms 

James Young 

President of College 
Department 

Clarence J. Haas 

President of Academy 
Department 

Ernest J. Myatt 

President of Theological 
Department 

Albert W. Smith 

President of Sub-Preparatory 
Department 

Elvin Angell 

Faculty Representative 

Prof. R. W. Gardner 



Chapel Announcement: 

"As President of the Student Organization, I wish to make the following announcement regarding 
the action of the Council : 

" 'In Council assembled the members of that august body have decided to hold a meeting every other 
Tuesday evening beginning the first Tuesday after the Second Semester registration, February z. All 
matters that require the attention of the Council should be either presented to some member prior to 
the meeting, or placed in the Student Council question box at the left of the Library entrance. ' 

j. w. AMES 




Page 78 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



First Semester 

John W. Ames 
Dorothy P. Peavey 
Lois A. Burgess 
Clarence J. Haas 
J. Willis Anderson 
Dalph Fry 
V. Kent Goodnow 
F. W. Nease 



Breseean Literary Society 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Chaplain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Chairman Program Committee 

P acuity Advisor 



Second Semester 

Arthur W. Morse 
Margaret Brown 
Florence E. Hand 
Paul A. Lunn 
H. Blair Ward 
John W. Ames 
Elsie C. Gatherer 
F. W. Nease 




Among the many activities of college life which one will not soon forget is the Breesean Literary 
Society. At times it proves to be a rock in a busy land and a shadow from the heat of examinations. 
Where is the member who never enjoys the programs? Go! Mark him well — if you can find him — but he 
is not. 

The Commencement Program of last year will never be forgotten. The very best talent in the society 
was called into play by a challenge from the Athenian Literary Society to the Breseean to present a 
program equal to one they were to give. Their Shakespearean program will long be remembered, even 
though the judges awarded the prize to the Breseeans. The theme of the program was The American 
Indian. Each number on the program, whether literary or musical, contributed to this one theme. 
The platform was decorated to represent the home of the Indian and its surroundings, — the wigwam, 
the primeval forest, the brushwood, grass, and the moon — all were there. One could not help but feel 
the call of the wild. 

Another mountain peak was reached this year when the program committee presented a Radio 
Program from Station WBLS. Each number was rebroadcast from stations in Europe and Asia; the 
Tracy sisters broadcast from India, Mademoiselle Sloane from Paris, Fraulein Dwinell and Herr 
Anderson from Germany. 

The Breseean Literary Society, we think, is bringing itself into readiness to answer any further 
challenges from its sister society, the Athenian. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 79 



Athenian Literary Society 

First Semester 
Ernest Myatt 
Virgil Hoover 
Estelle May Gardner 



Sadie Peavey 
Allison Horne 
David Jenkins 
Alice Spangenberg 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Chaplain 

Serge ant- at- Arms 

Faculty Advisor 



Second Semester 
Virgil Hoover 
Louis Michelson 
Edna Foote 
Helen Stebbins 
Joshua Wagner 
Joseph Knutson 
Vera Sears 




We Athenians are proud of our name because we believe it has a literary value. Greece, as we know, 
stands as one of the four components in the making of our civilization, for she gave us learning. At one 
time Athens, its capital, was the saviour of civilization, for when the barbarous Persian hordes swept 
across the Aegean Sea, the brave Athenians stepped forward to meet the issue and saved the day. There 
at Marathon the civilized West met the barbarous East and won a victory that meant permanency for 
Western enlightenment. We are the Athenians of today. 

We are always glad when Athenian night comes around, for we are sure of a good entertainment. 
Shall we ever forget the Travel Program? We crossed the Atlantic with a Scotchman during the perilous 
days of the war, learned something more of Canada from our friend across the border, were taken on an 
aeroplane ride with a Washingtonian, learned where the East ends and the West begins from a mid- 
Westerner, and ended in the orange fields when a migrator from New York gave us a vivid description 
of sunny Florida. 

Among the members who have contributed much to the development of our Society are a ventrilo- 
quist and musician of varied experience, and a player on the hand saw. No program would seem 
complete without them. 

We do not meet together for the purpose of entertainment alone. We hope that seed sown here in 
training will grow and bring forth fruit in our lives in the places to which God has called us. 

e. j. m. a'z6 



Page 80 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



President, Kent Goodnow 
Vice-President, Mary Jones 



Lyceum 

Officers 

Secretary and Treasurer, Elsie Gatherer 
Serge ant- at- Arms , David Jenkins 




Men ivant arguments to reconcile their minds to ivbat is done, as ivell as motives 
originally to act right. edmund burke 

Debating should not be an end in itself, but rather a means to an end. The E.N.C. Debating Club — 
the Lyceum — has high ideals of usefulness. It aims to promote clear thinking, to encourage individual 
research, to develop openness of mind in the quest for the truth. . 

To promote clear thinking. Nothing can give more satisfaction than the absolute assurance of Tight- 
ness. We may be ever so correct, yet our correctness will yield us little pleasure. Positive clear thinking 
gives assurance of Tightness. Among men there is — 

He that knows, and knows not that he knoivs — 
He is asleep — wake him; 



He who knoivs, and knoivs that he knoivs — 
He is a king — follow him! 

Debating promotes clear thinking. 

To encourage individual research. What a man finds out for himself will stay with him much longer, 
and do him more good, than what he is told. Debating requires individual research. 

To develop openness of mind in the search for truth. Few of us have found the truth in its entirety. 
Most of are learners. All evidence which comes before us should be tried. If we think clearly, -we will 
sift from it that which is precious, and the dross will be purged away. Debating tends to produce 
openness of mind. 

The society is young. What it will accomplish remains to be seen. May it attain its goal! 

k. g. c'2.7 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 81 



Publications 

GREEN BOOK 
A publication edited twice a semester by the College Rhetoric Class through an 
efficient staff elected by class vote. Its pages have furnished instruction, humor, and 
interest to every one who has turned them. 




STAFF 19x5-16 
Editor, Samuel Young 

Associate Editor, 

Margaret Brown 

Art Editor, Olive Tracy 

Art Associate, Helen Traudt 

College Humor, Edward Mann 

Business Manager, Thomas Brown 



TYPICAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 
From Edition of November, 192} 



Editorial 

Self-Pity 

More Money 

By (Mrs.) Jessie Hilliard 

Nautilus 

By Olive Tracy 

Tests 

By Jesse S. Richardson 
A Quarantine Station 

By T. M. Brown 

In His Service it— 13 

By Olive Tracy 

A Night-Time 14 

By Floris E. Sevigny 

A Dream 15-16 

By Helen Traudt 



4 

5 

6-7 
8 

9-10 



"Boys' Night" at the "Y" > . 17-18 
By Samuel Young 

Home 19 

By (Mrs.) Jessie Hilliard) 

Silence in the College Library zo-zi 
By Edward S. Mann 

Trivia zz-2_4 

By College Rhetoric Class 

Managerial Z5 

By John E. Riley 

College Humor z6-z8 

News Correspondence 

(Nov. 3-17) Z9-33 

Ads 34-37 

> ,*-' '!» if^\ < 

1 tf wy 



Page 82. 



The Nautilus 1926 



Nautilus 1926 





,f;* 








P"i- 


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W 



EDITORIAL 



"Anything that is worth doing is worth doing well." 
Every member of the 1916 Nautilus staff must have taken this 
as his motto consciously or unconsciously — that is if one's 
work be the criterion. 

The pages of this book will reveal the credit which should 
be given to the following: The Associate Editor who has been 
an efficient co-laborer in planning the organization of these; 
the Art Editor who with her associates has so zealously 
worked over every detail of the art motives, one of the chief 
features on our plans; the Literary Editor whose genius has 
furnished spicy flavor to her many contributions; the Literary 
Revisor who has seasoned every article with accuracy, chas- 
ing every wayward comma; the Associations Editor and 



College Life Editor who have offered contributions "of merit, 
of variety, and of interest; the dutiful Secretary — of whom we 
say if her deft fingers had not flown so swiftly over the keys 
our book might be still in the first stages of its evolution; 
then our zealous Faculty Advisor who has kept in touch with 
every movement of the Editorial Staff with constructive 
criticism and advice; we thank you, faithful staff. 

In submitting this book (to you, O reader), we would not 
fail to mention also the students outside the Staff who have 
assisted us with literary articles and pictures, as well as 
their most hearty support. We thank you, loyal students! 
You have made our voyage successful; you have furnished the 
breeze for our sails. 

Irva G. Phillips, Editor 



MANAGERIAL 



The business staff for the 192.5 Nautilus set a precedent in 
that annual that is hard to surpass. However, the business 
staff for the 192.6 Nautilus adopted the old slogan, "The Best 
Annual Yet," and began working to that end, in conjunction 
with the editorial staff. 

This slogan resulted in the usual problems of a business 
staff — that of securing the greatest possible number of sub- 
scriptions, and that of increasing the income from 
advertisements. 

The staff was encouraged by the loyal support of the student 
body, when on Subscription Day over twelve hundred sub- 
scriptions were secured in less than one hour and a half. 

The second task was undertaken and accomplished by our 
aggressive advertising manager, Chester Smith, and his 
faithful associates. The 1916 Nautilus owes much for its 
success to the loyal support of our advertisers, whom we 
wish to thank most sincerely. 



Realizing the need of immediate cash with which to work, 
the staff launched a contest to secure payments in advance for 
subscriptions. The students entered heartily into this contest, 
and before the "Herculeans" finally defeated the "Trojans" 
nearly $1,000 had been paid to the staff. 

In solving our problems, the business staff has been favored 
and helped greatly through the association with our faculty 
advisor, Prof. Karl Wildes. We have found pleasure in work- 
ing with one who has been thru' the mill. 

Our assistant business manager, Wesley Angell, has 
capably lightened the task of the business manager. We shall 
ever cherish our association with him. 

The Pinkham Press merits the appreciation of all for its 
splendid cooperation in the publishing of our Annual. 

To the business staff for the 19x7 Nautilus we submit 

"The Best Annual Yet" as a standard, and a possible slogan. 

Armond F. Rush, Business Manager 



Nautilus — igi6 





' Wrecked is the ship of pearl! 
And every chambered cell 
Before thee lies revealed." 



Page 84 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Evangelistic Association of Eastern Na^arene College 

OFFICERS 



President, Johx W. Ames 
Vice-President, George A. Rogers 



Secretary, Ruth I. Ede 
Treasurer, Johx W. Axdersox 




Pres. F. \Y. Xease 
Rev. J. Gould 

Appointment Committee 
Doris M. Gale 
Albert Lux.v 
Clarexce Haas 
Erxest Myatt 
Edith Axgell 
Hedvig Olsox 
Fred Koehler 

Lecture Committee 
Samuel Youxg 
Elsie Gatherer 
Armoxd Rush 



BOARD OF ADVISORS 
Rev. E. E. Axgell 

Mr. L. D. Peavey 
Rev. H. V. Miller 

Managing Committee 
Albert W. Smith 
Roy Bowers 
William Turkixgtox 
Virgil Hoover 
Paul Luxx 
David Jexkixs 
Altox Perktxs 

Tract Committee 
Margaret Brows- 
Ruth Ede 
Chester Smith 



Rev. Thomas Laite 
Rev. E. T. Frexch 

Publicity Committee 
Edward Deware 
Mary Joxes 
Joshua Wagner 
Fraxk Bowers 
Olive Tracy 



Membership Comtnittee 
Margaret Patix 
James Youxg 
Doxxa Ralph 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 Page 85 



Forward 

The Clarion Call has sounded down through the ages to the people of God, "Go 
preach the gospel to every creature. ' ' The young men and women of the centuries past 
answered and served Jesus Christ faithfully in their day. But their day has gone, and 
now we, the members of Eastern Nazarene College Evangelistic Association, have 
heard the call and with our voices have replied, ' 'By Thy grace we will" . 

We will — what? Preach the gospel at the uttermost parts of the earth? Nay, verily, 
we will preach the gospel to the uttermost parts of the earth. That means that every 
step we take on our way to these uttermost parts we will carry, and proclaim aloud, 
the good news of salvation. It is an old saying and a true one that, "The light which 
shines farthest shines brightest at home' ' . We are firm believers in the policy held by 
our General Superintendents that many, many are the souls at home who ought to 
hear the truth as it is in Jesus. Slackers at home are slackers abroad. (Do not think 
that the term 'abroad' is confined strictly to Africa, India, China, and the Isles of the 
Sea. To many of our number 'abroad' means that day or time when they will take up 
the work of a pastor, evangelist, lay-preacher, deaconess, or Sunday School teacher.) 
It would be easy for us to sit back in an easy-chair and dream of that grand day when 
we shall bud forth and surprise the church at large with our brilliancy, our oratory, 
and our deep piety. Successes have again and again been chronicled on the records of 
time, but never the fantasies of the dreamer. The plain, rugged, truthful directions of 
the road which leads to success have been given to us by our faithful advisers. (May 
God make us men and women of like calibre.) 

If we would win in the great battle of life, if we would succeed in the fight against 
sin, if we would proclaim the truth as the Bible teaches it, if we would be winners of 
precious souls, we must labor, labor Noiu, pray Note, intercede for lost humanity 
Now, — if we hope to be successful workers for Jesus Christ, regardless of the field or 
the nature of the call. Now is our opportunity to work, and we are, at this very 
moment, doing so with the help of God. 

Our young men have been engaged in active service in the ministry of the Word. 
One is the pastor of a Nazarene church. Many are supplying vacancies and answering 
calls from our sister churches. Young People's services have been held which have 
brought salvation and blessing to not a few. Sunday school work and Mission work 
are almost wholly manned by groups of our members. Our young ladies have not 
been idling away their precious moments, but have willingly and faithfully held 
missionary meetings and sung the gospel week after week on platform and street 
corner. 

Pastors of our Eastern Educational Zone, we are at your command — Now. God has 
called us into His service. We are eager to assist you in whatever way you need us, 
whether to sing, testify, preach, or wrestle with God in praver. Remember! "For- 
ward" is our watchword. 

Forward, marching forward 
Through the toil and fight 
Till the veil be lifted 
Till our faith be sight." e. c. g. c'xS 



Page 86 



The Nautilus 1926 



Missionary Society 




OFFICERS 
President, Prof. G. C. Cowdrey Vice-President , Clarence J. Haas 

Recording Secretary, Margaret W. Brown Corresponding Secretary, Martha L. Tracy 
Treasurer, Ernest J. Myatt Assistant Treasurer, Edith A. Angell 

The Missionary Society is planned to include every member of the student body and the Faculty of 
Eastern Nazarene College. Since the society incorporates both Foreign and Home Missionary interests, 
it must have concern for all without the gospel, everywhere. 

One chapel service each week is set aside for missionary interests. Too, one of the "after supper" 
prayer-meetings each week is devoted to prayer for our missions. As to the zeal expressed in giving — 
this year the society has pledged $900 for Foreign and Home Missions. 
DO YOU KNOW — 

That we are planning, and carrying into effect a series of talks for the Wednesday morning Chapel 
services, on the history of our Nazarene Missions in the various fields? 

That, considering the problem of our missionary deficit, Professor Munro wrote a beautiful song of 
appeal? The title given the song is "Blocking the Way"; the tune that of the hymn "Looking This 
Way". 

That Rev. K. Hawley Jackson, one of our much-prized missionaries from India, was with us in two 
chapel services and gave stirring addresses on the work in India? 

That dear Doctor Reynolds came among us designating himself over the telephone as merely "Mr. 
Reynolds"? He came so suddenly but oh, so welcome! Although we were deprived of the happy antici- 
pation of his coming, we retained in his going the sweet fragrance of sincere humility. "Doctor 
Reynolds, please don't change. 

That Mrs. Minerva B. Marshall, one of our missionaries from Africa, was with us for a Wednesday 
night prayer meeting? She took us all to Africa and left us there. 

That we are looking forward to more messages from our missionaries, and also to missionary stereop- 
ticon lectures. We pray that through these, God shall enlarge our vision of the needs of the world and 
help us to give more of ourselves to His cause. e. b. w. 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 87 



Prospective Missionaries 

I heard Him call 
"Come, follow," — that was all. 
My gold grew dim, 
My soul went after Him. 
I rose and folloived — that ivas all. 
Who ivould not follow if he heard 
Him call! 



PHILLIPS BROOKS 



AFRICA 

Ruth Belmont 
Prof. G. C. Cowdrey 
Clarence J . Haas 
Ernest J. Myatt 
Margaret E. Patin 
Irva G. Phillips 
G. Max Powers 



INDIA 

Paul H. Loeffler 
Grace Lorrey 
Lawrence McAllen 
Armond F. Rush 
Martha L. Tracy 
Olive G. Tracy 
Anna Waner 



CHINA 
Clyde Prouty 



KOREA 
Mary E. Jones 




Page 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Young People's Society 




OFFICERS 
President, Albert Smith 
Vice-President , Martha Tracy 
Secretary, Ruth Ede 



Treasurer, Blair Ward 
Chorister, James Young 
Pianist, Edith Angell 



Master, it is good to be 
Entranced, enwrapt, alone with Thee! 
'Till we, too, change from grace to grace, 
Gating on that transfigured face. 

A. P. STANLEY 

We may well infer from one of St. Paul's writings that there were individuals who after meeting a 
certain situation, walked away entering the same beaten path again, living the same life, and forgetting 
that they were persons under a moral decree. They would allow no situation to stir them to aspire to 
greater activities. It seemed that they forgot the injunction of the Apostle to ' 'follow after, if that they 
might apprehend that for which also they were apprehended of Christ Jesus". 

The object of this Society is to build Christian character, thereby apprehending that for which we 
were apprehended of Christ, lifting our spirit-vision above the din of mundane life, giving us such 
relationship with the Father and His Son, Jesus Christ, as to exceed anything that we can ask or think. 

Environment occupies a large place in determining a life. If we want a young child to become a 
great painter or musician we surround him with circumstances that will draw out the talents of that 
nature in the desired direction. It also is a fact that we become copies of the patterns we use. May our 
pattern be Jesus Christ. He is the One who is altogether lovely. 

This Society has a forty-five minute meeting every Sunday evening. A different speaker is appointed 
for each service, giving all the benefit of each one's experience and personality. Great help is received 
from the talks on faith, piety, and holy living. 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 89 



New England District 




TURKINGTON, MYATT, AMES, BOWERS, MACCALLUM, TAYLOR, HILYARD, DOBSON, DIAZ, BROWN, HAGERMAN, 
MANN, ROGERS, DOBSON, LUNN, HORNE, RILEY, GOODNOW, POWERS, WAGNER, ANGELL, MACDONALD, LUNN, 

MIROYIANNIS, PERKINS 
YEO, MAYO, HAAS, KNUTSON, ALEXANDER, TRACY, ANGILLY, DEWARE, FOOTE, LORREY, OLIVER, WAYLES, 
JEFFERY, GOOZEE, BELMONT, GOTT, MUNRO, HARRIS, RALPH, WANER, ALLEN, DUNNING, RICH, ALLEN, 

TRACY, BURGESS, BROWN, DIAZ, STANFORD 
SPANGENBERG, FOOTE, PEAVEY, GALE, ANGELL, PILLSBURY, GAY, HUDSON, PEAVEY, ACKERMAN, DWINELL, 
GOULD, GOULD, GARDNER, NEASE, ANGELL, MILLETT, MILLETT, PHILLIPS, 
YOUNG, DAVIS, ANGELL, WAYLES, RIVERS, MARTIN, MACKINNAN, BROWN 



New York District 




MORSE LOEFFLER 

DESALVO, DOWNS, WHITE, PROUTY, PARK, SMITH, FULLER, KLAISS 
STEBBINS, TRAUDT, SIEGMANN, OLSON, FULLER, KUNZE, MILLER 



Page 90 



The Nautilus 1926 



Washington-Philadelphia District 




KOEHLER, HAND, DICKEY, BOWERS 



Pittsburgh District 




JENKINS, STEARNS, SMITH, ANDERSON, WARD, RUSH, FRY, MCALLEN, YOUNG, YOUNG 
EDE, JONES, SLOAN, GILBERT, SAITER, GARDNER, PATIN, GATHERER, DEWITT 







The Nautilus 1926 



Page 91 



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Page 91 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Euterpean Club 



OFFICERS 

President, Reba Miller Vice-President, Roy Bowers 

Secretary and Treasurer, Marjorie Deware 



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mm Mi "Till *^fe- 





' 'Music resembles poetry; in each are nameless graces 

Which no methods teach, 

And which a master-hand alone can reach." 

As Eastern Nazarene College has progressed in every phase of college life, so has 
she taken a step forward in the department of Fine Arts. The Euterpean Club, 
organized this year, is composed of students from the departments of Expression, 
Voice, Violin, Piano, and Wind Instruments. Once a month are held meetings in 
which programs of the highest standard are given. It is the purpose of the Club to 
develop talent, to draw out personality, and to inspire men and women to higher 
ideals in The Arts. r. p. m. 

Music envelopes and permeates the world we live in. Land, water, and sky are full 
of elemental music of many kinds and degrees of intensity. 

The potency of music has been acknowledged in all ages and by all races. It is said 
that long, long ago Orpheus charmed all things animate and inanimate with the 
strains of his lyre. And everyone knows of the Sirens who bewitched sailors with 
their songs in the Grecian Isles, and the Lorelei maiden on the rock above the 
Rhine. 

This suggests the thought, often stated, that good music ennobles and bad music 
degrades. I think, however, that music intensifies existing ideas and instincts, good 
or bad. kreisler 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 93 



Eastern Na^arene College Chorus 




Doris M. Gale, Director 
Alice Spangenberg, Pianist 



Tenor 


Soprano 


Alto 


Bass 


Young 


Tracy 


Peavey 


Ward 


Myatt 


Jeffery 


Belmont 


Haas 


Dew are 


Miller 


Tracy 


Dobson 


LuNN 


Fuller 


Angell 


LUNN 


Anderson 


Gale 


Siegmann 


Young 



Song is the utterance of all longing of the soul in joy or in sorrow. Song expresses in 
melody and words what the soul feels. King David wrote his psalms as the utterances 
of his soul. Some were songs of repentance, some were of petitioning, and others were 
of praise to his God and Saviour. 

The chorus of E. N. C. is composed of twenty members, forming five quartets. The 
main purpose of the chorus is to glorify our Lord and Saviour through the singing of 
Gospel hymns. Each member realizes that Gospel singing has a large part in the work 
of the Kingdom. As a body it has been privileged to assist in many revival meetings, 
in Cambridge, West Somerville, and other places. 

M. L. T. 

Music religious heat inspires, 
It ivakes the soul and lifts it high 
And ivings it with sublime desires, 
And fits it to bespeak the Deity . 

ADDISON 



Page 94 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Could I but Sing 



Could I but sing, I would sing to make you happy. Not a funny song that would bring only laughter to 
your lips, but a song of carefree children playing in a daisy field, with joyous, laughing music that 
would bring sweet memories to your world-weary spirit. Or perhaps I would choose a little twinkling 
song of waves rippling up a white and sandy beach, where the sand-pipers searched for food, and a 
puppy frolicked. Such songs as these would I sing to you, could I but sing. 

Could I but sing, I would sing you a song of adventure that would stir your pulses and make your heart 
beat high with ambition. Not a song of bravery and tragedy, but a song of hope and conquest — of the 
lonely light-keeper, faithful in untold danger, though there be only one to help — of the onward urge 
through jungle fastnesses, where the bearer of good news presses on, not knowing nor fearing if danger 
lurks beside the path — of one dying victorious, and calling to you to carry on, lest the foe sweep back. 
Such a song, in stirring and triumphant strains, would I sing to you, could I but sing. 

Could I but sing, I would sing to you of peace and rest. Not of twilight peace and evening rest, when 
the day is worn out, and rest is the end of labor; but of daytime rest when the sun is high and warm, of 
rest while work awaits — of a peaceful pasture with a brook flowing through, where you linger for rest 
and thankful prayer, and an oriole sings in the elm tree. Such a song of peace that is rest, and rest that is 
peace, would I sing to you, could I but sing. 

Could I but sing, I would sing to you of love. Not a song of hopeless or thwarted love that would 
fill you with heartache and yearning, but a song of love abounding, ever waiting, ever calling, always 
understanding, always satisfying. Of such a love as this would I sing to you, could I but sing. 

Could I but sing these songs to you, what would you do? Would your heart still be untouched? Or 
would my songs stir you as my words never do, so that you would be moved to seek that wondrous 
love, to lay hold on that peace and rest, to join the great adventure, and to find happiness as a little 
child in God's beautiful kingdom. Ah me! Could I but sing! 

j. P. H. 



Aileel 

Aileel swung his harp into position and softly plucked the strings. The birds above stopped their 
twittering and chattering and listened to the golden voice. Sweeter and higher rose the melody — trill 
after trill of merry, laughing music. The little harebells nodded their dainty heads in unison. 

Aileel walked slowly down the village lane, his head bent. His heart was heavy. The Master had 
sent him and his friends into the world. "Somewhere," He had said, "there is a place for each one of 
you — some work for you to do. Only you can find it, only you can fill it. ' ' 

With the others, Aileel had come to earth, and through the long days since, he had searched. But 
everywhere people were going about their accustomed tasks, busy with the cares of life and nowhere 
seeming to work for him. 

He had played and sang on his way through the hamlets, striving to keep up his own courage. The 
breezes carried along the wisps of melody. The heart of a tired mother was strangely rested by the sweet 
refrain, a discouraged man listened and took renewed strength. Everywhere hearts were lighter and life 
seemed dearer to those who caught the beautiful harmonies. 

Yet Aileel went on harping and singing, always searching for his place, not knowing that he had 
found it. 

l. m. d. c'2.6 



The Nautilu 



9 2 6 



Page 95 





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Page 96 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Young Women s Athletic Association 




GAY, BELMONT, TRACY, BROWN, TRACY, TRAUDT, GILBERT, ANGILLY, DEWITT, SAITER, ALLEN, HUDSON, 

ALLEN, DWINELL 
MACKINNAN, GARDNER, JONES, WANER, RALPH, GOTT, HAND, GOOZEE, OLIVER, KLAISS, BROWN, RICH, 

PATIN, PHILLIPS, JEFFERY, JOHNSON 
SIEGMANN, GALE, ANGELL, FULLER, DOWNS, WAYLES, PEAVEY, SLOAN, DEWARE, STEBBINS, KUNZE, FOOTE, 

PILLSBURY, FOOTE 



r, 



ennis 



Club 




KNUTSON, BROWN, MORSE, YOUNG, YOUNG, SMITH, RUSH, MANN, ANGELL, WARD 
GOOZEE, SLOAN, GARDNER, FOOTE, FULLER, TRACY, DOWNS, FOOTE, TRACY, GALE, ANGELL 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 97 



Young Women s Athletic Association 

OFFICERS 

President, Marie Sloan 
Vice-President, Edna Foote 
Secretary, Helen Stebbins 
Treasurer, Marjorie Deware 



Rackets! Rackets! Rackets! No — not noise but tennis rackets. They are always in 
display on warm fall afternoons, especially from 4 to 6 p.m. That is when every girl 
answers the call of the outdoors, usually in a tennis game. There one may hear from 
the direction of the courts such exclamations as — Service! Ball! Love-40! 



In the meantime we must be busy with our kodaks, for we are well aware that the 
snap contest with the Y. M. A. A. is soon to occur. Excitement runs high for several 
days and then comes the final day of reckoning. This year it was the girls' turn to in- 
flict the penalty, and how we did enjoy those molasses kisses. Last year the boys 
scored. Now it remains to be seen who will break the tie. 



The school year, however, wouldn't seem to go right unless the Y. W. A. A. 
entertained the Y. M. A. A. at a Hallowe'en social. The gymnasium was converted 
into a haunt for spooks and witches and the entertainment of the evening was in 
keeping with the season. We were pleasurably surprised with a return social given in 
our honor bv the Y. M. A. A. 



Ten above, and mercury is going down! The snow and ice cover the courts; our 
attention is turned elsewhere. Basket ball now appears on the scene and fills our spare 
moments for recreation, when the lure for skating isn't great. 



Some day we are going to meet all the challenges we've made to the Y. M. A. A. 
Bereadv, Y. M. A. A.! 



Page 98 



The Nautilus 1926 



Young Mens Athletic Association 




ANGELL, TURKINGTON, HILYARD, DICKEY, TAYLOR, PROUTY, YEO, MCALLEN, RILEY, JENKINS, POOLE, 

ANGELL, RUSH 
GOODNOW, LOEFFLER, DOBSON, DOBSON, MYATT, STEARNS, MANN, DEWARE, ROGERS, FULLER, AMES, 
YOUNG, HAGERMAN, SMITH, MORSE, SMITH, PERKINS, BROWN, HOOVER, WARD, PARK, YOUNG, WHITE, 

MARTIN, KNUTSON 
RIVERS, WAYLES 



BASKET-BALL TEAM 




WARD, ANGELL, MANN, YOUNG, BROWN, MORSE, HOOVER, PARK, PERKINS, POOLE, YOUNG 



College 

A. Morse 
T. Brown 
W. Angell 

E. Mann 

B. Ward 



Left Fonvard 
Right Fonvard 
Center 

Right Guard 
Left Guard 



Academy 

A. Perkins 

V. Hoover 

J. Young 

J. Poole (Wm. Park) 

Ross Park 



The Nautilus 1926 Page 99 



Young Mens Athletic Association 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

President, Virgil Hoover 
Vice-President, Blair Ward 
Secretary-Treasurer , Thomas Brown 
College Representative, Arthur Morse 
Caretaker, James Young 

Associate Caretakers 

Ross Park 
Louis Michelson 

Some individuals at E. N. C. are naturally "students". Books are their constant and 
inseparable companions. But these persons are comparatively few in number. There is 
another class whose chief delight is in sports. The thud of a baseball in a catcher's 
mitt is music in their ears; in fact, any form of athletics is an irresistible force not to 
be opposed at any time. This band is also small in number. But the large majority of 
E. N. C. students are in the middle of the road, being frequently indifferent to the call 
of books, and at prolonged intervals negligent concerning physical exercise. 

Our faculty has been (and is) very competent in coping with the former indiffer- 
ence, but it has been the task of the Athletic Associations to raise the cry against and 
supply a remedy for the latter negligence. We do not have compulsory physical train- 
ing, but we do try by enthusiastic student sports to enlist the attention and activities 
of all. There is neither age limit nor weight barrier. The old (?) exercise to regain 
their youth, and the young train to keep fit. The heavy-weights run to reduce, and 
the thin folk try to get fat by a similar procedure. 

Our chief sports are tennis, swimming, basket-ball, skating, and baseball. We also 
play hockey and soccer occasionally. Tennis, basket-ball, baseball, and soccer can be 
played on our own grounds. Swimming, skating, and hockey are within a five minute 
walk of the college. 

Best of all, we are constantly proving that we can "do all to the glory of God" . 



Page ioo 



The Nautilus 1926 



Language Club 



OFFICERS 

President, Marie Sloan 
Vice-President, Edith Angell 



Secretary, Albert Lunn 
Treasurer, Virgil Hoover 




MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING 

Uno day, just a few Minuten before la classe, Lurla kam rushing in as Maria sat in her camera, exclamans, 
" fl Mar'za! regarded ma lettre that I just received von meinem Vater. He says that he remittit me TrevTe 
boites of oranges." 

"That's magnum! Wann will they arriver?" 

"In decern dias. Nunc we will have a pique-nique et genug oranges pour uns and our Kameraden." 

"Well , I'll kommen encore when they come, but I must go vvv estudiar my Schulbuch.' ' 

"Can you comprendre that Greek leccibn?" 

"Non, I can't find dies word avTnrapacricevci£oiJ.ai. 

"Well, id isn't as mal as the German word varstellungsvermeogen." 

"The verba that I have the most difficult ad With, in the other langages are the verbs. Would you imagine 
that oiaco in Greek was a form of the verb cpepco, or that latus in Latin was a participle of the verb 
fero?" 

"What about vont in French coming from alter, and yendo in Spanish being a form of ir, or bin in 
German coming from sein? Oh! these linguae are so embrouiU'ees!" 

"Well, after all, our English est peculiaris aussi. Did you ever think of the English word kernel? 
When spelled k-e-r-n-e-1 it is defined as 'the meat of a nut', and c-o-l-o-n-e-1 is defined as 'an officer in 
the army'." 

Just then la cloche rang for class und thus came the finis to the conversacibn. 



T h e Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 101 



Palmer Science and Mathematics Club 

OFFICERS 



President, Arthur Morse 
Vice-President, Margaret Brown 



Secretary, Edith Angell 
Treasurer, Kent Goodnow 




Motto: Efficiency our Exponent 

To know a truth in its relation to other truths is to know it scientifically. Science is 
knowledge gained and verified by exact observation and correct thinking, especially 
as methodically formulated and arranged in a rational system; it may be also the 
sum of universal knowledge. 

The oldest science of our many fields is Astronomy. This science was studied as far 
back as the old Bible times, and at present proves a field of many possibilities. Along 
with Astronomy, or shortly after, came the science which has been said to be the most 
exacting of all sciences, Mathematics. Much has been done toward the development 
of this field, but in no way is it exhausted. Another of the old sciences, which means 
much to us today, is Chemistry. Physics also is used very extensively in our com- 
mercial world. 

These with many others equally important may be summed together and known as 
Science, or sometimes as Modern Science. It may be regarded as one vast miracle, 
whether we view it in relation to the Almighty Being, by whom its objects and its 
laws were formed, or to the feeble intellect of man, by which its depths have been 
sounded, and its mysteries explored. 

d. w. f. c'i7 




. ,*-' T' /("v ",3. -. 







Page 1 02. 



The Nautilus 1926 



Amphictyon Council 



OFFICERS 
President, Virgil Hoover Vice-President, Dorothy Peavey 

Secretary and Treasurer, Marie Sloan 




All students taking a course in history are eligible for membership in this student 
organization. The purpose is to keep alive our desire for historical knowledge. 

In ancient times the celebrated Amphictyonic Council was composed of the states 
in ancient Greece. They were organized to protect an ideal temple common to them 
all. Hence our name. When we organized to protect some common ideal temple we 
could think of no name more fitting than Amphictyon — an organization to protect 
our ideal, love of history. 

It is said, "We have only the past by which to judge the future." If this statement 
be true, and we believe it is, a great number of us are learning about the future by a 
study of the past. A mutual interest in historical facts, in learning all that has tran- 
spired before our time to make our existing conditions possible, has bound us together 
in this Amphictyon Council. We realize that in order to have a well rounded edu- 
cation we must be accurate in connecting points of fact and in associating important 
events with certain dates. We realize that in order to have such fundamental ideas we 
must study history, the narrative of the life of humanity. Hence our organization — 
to enable us to study history in practical ways, from lectures as well as from books. 

j. c'x9 



M. E. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 103 



Calendar of School Life 



SEPTEMBER 



Monday, 7 — Labor Day. All students laboring hard to 
make E.N C. by Tuesday. 

Tuesday, 8 — Registration Day. Halls of E.N. C. filled with 
young folk eager (?) to be relieved of surplus cash. 



9 — Class schedule pushed through in ten 
minute periods getting through in time for dinner — a most 
important requisite in student life. 

The great Holiness Convention opened in the afternoon 
with Brother Maybury, Superintendent of the Washington- 
Philadelphia District, as the speaker. "Bobo" Anderson 
arrived. 

Thursday, 10 — Many "faith" students out looking for 
work. "According to your faith be it unto you." 
Fine service in evening. 

Friday, 11 — New students find out the kind of assign- 
ments they get at E.N.C. 
Plenty of work ahead! 

Saturday, \~l — Study is under way. The workers are 
working. 

Sunday, 13 — Three great services of power and blessing. 
The convention closed with several students saved and 
sanctified. Praise the Lord! 

Tuesday, 15 — Brother Haas arrives at the Cardboard 
Palace, 11 p.m., from his evangelistic services in Ohio. 



y, 16 — Marie Sloan is with us. 
First regular prayer meeting in the evening. 

Friday, 18 — Faculty Reception. All students and faculty 
members are now officially and formally acquainted. But try 
and remember all the new names! 

Saturday, 19 — Those good, old-fashioned New England 
baked beans for supper! How they tickle the palate. 

Sunday, 2.0 — Sunday School commences. President Nease 
preached a heart searching sermon in the evening on "Christ 
the Truth." Four souls prayed through to victory. 

The Lord is here. 



Monday, 2.1 — Professor Gardner told some of his thrilling 
and interesting experiences of the summer, in chapel service. 
We are all glad he lived to tell us about them. 

Wednesday, 2.3 — Professor Angell has "begun" to miss 
classes. We are sorry for him, but really the vacant periods are 
welcome. 

Thursday, -l\ — And still the students come! Mr. and Mrs. 
Home and child, Max Powers, and Victor Dickey arrive. 
Always room for one more. 

Student Organization conducts chapel service. Armond 
Rush is elected as the Business Manager of the 192.6 Nautilus. 
Success to him! 

Friday, 2.5 — The first literary program given by the B.L.S. 
Well attended. Very good talent among the new students. 

Saturday, 2.6 — First hike of the season. Chaperoned by Mrs. 
Gould. Three couples wend their way to Squantum. Brother 
Mann makes his debut with M. Deware. 

Sunday, 2.7 — $134 cash offering for the foreign mission 
deficit in the morning service. Brother Archibald from Africa 
gave a most helpful and encouraging message in the evening. 
God bless him! 

Monday, z8 — The Monday morning chapel reports com- 
mence. West Somerville is progressing with Brother Greene 
as pastor. 

Cold weather ahead! The coal supply comes. 

Evangelistic Association elects its new officers. 

Tuesday, 19 — Library rules read in chapel. Silence! 

Wednesday, 30 — Marching out of chapel is at last 

inaugurated. 

\ 
Yes, the last of September! 

A unique prayer meeting. Mr. Jenkins says that his religion 
is better felt than "telt". 

The council meets in the usual place at the usual time. 



Page 104 



The Nautilus 1926 



Historic Touches 

SPARIBIANS 
A calico pup did it all ! 

With all the dignity and conventionality of Parliamentary regime were they 
organized. Eight promising young women in the bloom of youth united and solemnly 
took that preponderous vow — not to go out with any young man until they were 
twenty-one years of age. How well they kept that vow the annals of history do not 
record. 

The illustrious (?) society was named for its most faithful mascot the ragged, un- 
gainly calico pup of the College Girls' Dormitory. 

The history of 19x5-2.6 school year would hardly be complete without honorable 
mention being made of the group, which though now practically extinct still lives in 
the memory of all who have ever met calico "Sparibs." 

THE PASSING OF THE B.C. 

Of all the idiosyncrasies and eccentricities attached to the male sex of our Alma 
Mater none surpasses in ridiculousness the so-called Bachelors' Club. How absurd to 
think of the bare possibility of the maintenance of such an untoward society. For 
its existence to be assured it would need a constituency other than hypocrites. But 
alas ! I fear that those who have sworn the deepest allegiance and sounded forth with 
loudest acclaim their membership are the very ones who have fallen the farthest from 
the ideals of the Club. 

How illustrious was its inception the beginning of last year, but how quickly one 
member followed in the downward course of another. 

Behold, this year it is not (naught) ! Just a fleeting memory as we think of those 
who once professing such a high state of bachelorhood are now swiftly pursuing 
their inevitable objective — non-bachelorhood. 



A Perfect Year 

(With apologies to Carrie Jacobs Bond) 



When you come to the end of a Perfect Year 
And you sit alone with your thought 
While the chimes ring out with their glad, good cheer 
For the joy that the year has brought. 
Do you think tuhat the end of a Perfect Year 
Can mean to a tired Staff 

When the debts are -paid and the books are clear, 
And it s worries are on the shelf 7 . 



Well, this is the end of a Perfect Year 
Near the end of the voyage too, 
But it leaves a hope that is big and strong 
And a wish that is kind and true. 
For memory has painted this Perfect Year 
In colors that never fade, 
For we find at the end of a Perfect Year 
THE NAUTILUS BOOK we've made. 



Advertiser s Index 



ART SUPPLIES 

Arnold, W.T 116 

AUTO SUPPLIES 

"Chet's" Tire Shop 117 

BAKERY 

"Billy" the Baker 115 

Crane's Home Bakery no 

BANK 

Granite Trust Co 12.6 

BARBERS 

James Kittridge 12.0 

Gideon Rogers 134 

Young Sally's 115 

BEAUTY SHOP 

Hancock Beautv Shop 116 

BOOKS 

Farwell, M 117 

Volume Library 108 

Webster's Dictionary 12.1 

Wilson Index Co 114 

BOOK BINDING 

Burlen & Son 137 

BONDS 

Harty.F. L 118 

BRUSHES 

Fuller Co in 

CHURCHES 

Cambridge Nazarene 131 

East Rockaway Nazarene 133 

John Wesley Nazarene 131 

Lowell Nazarene 131 

Lynn Nazarene 131 

Maiden Nazarene 133 

North Hill Nazarene 133 

Richmond Hill Nazarene 133 

Wollaston Nazarene 133 

New England District Camp Meeting 136 

Washington-Philadelphia District Camp Meeting . . 12.9 
CLOTHING 

CahillJ. P n 9 

Donaher's ixo 

Fisher's 108 

"Harry" the Tailor 134 

McDonald, D. M 12.4 

Nash Co ix6 

Norfolk Haberdashery 135 

Talbot's 113 

COAL 

Bertha Consumers 135 

Quincy Coal Co. 114 

CONFECTIONERY 

Alhambra Candy Shop 12.8 

Greenleaf Sweet Shop 114 

Hilliard's Glass House 119 

McMurray'sSpa 12.6 

Millett,W. A 115 

Reynolds, H. F 108 

Wollaston Spa 12.8 

CONTRACTOR 

Hitchings, G 12.5 

DECORATING 

Robbins 117 

DENTISTS 

Burrell,H. F 107 

Cobb, A. B 107 

Crimmins,J. F 107 

Pearce, G. F. S 107 

DRUGS 

Johnson Drug Co 131 

Klein's 109 

Platner m 

DRY GOODS 

Grant, L. W 12.8 

Wollaston Department Store 12.4 

ENGRAVING 

Standard Engraving Co 138 

FLORIST 

Leonard, E.J 12.0 

GARAGE 

Yule's . 12.0 



GAS 



12.4 



Citizens' Gas Co . . -. 130 

HARDWARE 

Andros m 

INSURANCE 

Eisner, Henry 122. 

JEWELER 

Mayer, F 124 

LAUNDRY 

Old Colony ■ . 113 

LUMBER 

Blacker and Shepherd Co 119 

MACHINERY 

Ideal Machine Co. 

MUSICAL SUPPLIES 

Lewis, E. A 121 

White Manufacturing Co 108 

NOVELTIES 

Black Cat Shoppe 120 

McMurray'sSpa n_6 

OPTICIANS AND OPTOMETRISTS 

Bruce, A. R xoj 

Fuller, W. S I07 

Sparling, H.J-. I07 

Wight, R. H I13 

PHYSICIAN 

Crawford, L. P joy 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Purdy I2 .8 

PLUMBER 

Hibbett, F. W „ 5 

PRINTERS 

Pinkham Press ^7 

Ricker Printing Co 115 

Vallee Press 1x4 

PROVISIONS 

Balsor's Market no 

Clougher, C. M 117 

Wm. A. Doe & Company m 

Emerson, G. D jxx 

Granite City Ice Co n6 

Jersey Butter Co 12.0 

Maynard, F L nj 

White Bros 



114 

White Rose Bread 125 

RADIO 

Wollaston Radio Shop 117 

REAL ESTATE 

Merrill, L. C no 

RESTAURANTS 

Butler's Lunch 128 

Lilah Tea Shop 130 

Plaza Lunch m 



Rose Bowl Cafe' 



"5 



Thompson's Cafe 116 

Wollaston Dairy Lunch 134 

SHOES 

Liberty Shoe Store n6 

Smalley-Terhune Co no 

SHOE REPAIRING 

O'Brien, E.J 135 

Hancock Shoe Repairing Shop 12.8 

King, P.J no 

SPORTING GOODS 

Merchandise Sales Co 124 

STATIONERY 

Finn, E. B i io 

McKenzie 134 

STATISTICAL INSTITUTE 

Babson, Roger W 139 

TAILORS 

Beach Tailoring Co ." 13! 

Brodv Bros 125 

CahillJ. P. nj 

Page, Guy L i 8 

Smith Bros nc 

TYPEWRITERS 

Boston Typewriting Co 123 

Y.M.C.A. 

Quincy „6 



Page 106 The Nautilus 1926 

Eastern Na^arene College 



Cosmopolitan 

This year's college group represents twenty-two states, seven foreign countries 
and five Canadian Provinces. Here one gains the breadth of outlook and trueness 
of insight characteristic of all genuine culture. 
Interdenominational 

While operated and controlled by the Church of the Nazarene, this institution 
incorporates those principles of Christian brotherhood which make it a center 
for young folk of all evangelical faiths. Twelve denominations are represented in 
our registration. 
Progressive 

Our curricula are dictated by the best standards of scholarship and efficiency. 
Supervised study for academic students prepares for intensive application in 
college and theological courses. 
Spiritual 

Our task is evangelistic and spiritual as well as educational. The large major- 
ity of our students are exemplary Christians. Special evangelistic services; 
regular weekly meetings; a wholesome religious atmosphere; these combine j:o 
produce the highest type of Christian character. 
Varied Departments — Opportunities for employment — Information supplied. 

FALL OPENING, SEPTEMBER 7, 19x6 
Floyd W. Nease, A.M., B.D., President 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 107 



Professional Cards 



Compliments of 

L. P. CRAWFORD 

75 Elm Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

DR. GEORGE F. S. PEARCE 

Dentist 

357 Newport Avenue 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: Granite 2808 



Compliments of 
HAROLD F. BURRELL, D.M.D. 




Compliment 

DR. A.B. COBB, D.M.D. 
P. O. Block Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: Granite 4065 -J 



ARTHUR O. BRUCE, M.D. 

Oculist 

780 Beacon Street 
Boston, Mass. 

Hours: 2. to 4.30 p.m. 

Appointment only 

Telephone: kenmore 1760 

HAROLD J. SPARLING, O.D. 

Optometrist and Optician 
184 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Opposite Public Garden 

Hours: 9.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 

Evenings by Appointment 

Special Attention to E. N. C. Students 
Telephone: back bay 942.7 



Compliments of 
JOHN F. CRIMMINS, D.M.D. 

656 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Gardner Building 

Telephone: Granite 3849 



Eyes Examined 
Glasses Prescribed 




MYSTIC 

2.850 



Take care of your eyes if you wish tbem 
to serve you efficiently. 



DR. WINFIELD S. FULLER 

Optometrist 

central building 
medford square medford, mass. 



Page ic 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Cleaning 



Dyeing 



FISHER'S 

Where the Smartest Clothes can be bought 
for less 

MEN'S and YOUNG MEN'S 
TWO PANT SUITS 

$14.50 3x9.50 $34.50 



Com-pliments of 

GUY L. PAGE 

Your Groom 

33 Beale Street, 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 4691 
Repairing Expert Pressing 



FISHER'S 

Quincy, Mass. 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



VOLUME LIBRARY 

By A. B. Brubacher, Ph.D., President of N. Y. State 
College for Teachers, and more than fifty other leading 
American Educators. The standard, up-to-date, reliable 
reference book for college students and all other pupils, 
used and recommended by college professors. 

Pres. Floyd W. Nease says: "I am impressed with its 
great value for research work. I feel you are doing the 
community a distinct service in offering to its homes this 
publication." 

EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION 



41 Winter Street 



Boston, Mass. 



HERBERT F. REYNOLDS 

Manufacturer s Agent 
Jobber of Confectionery and Specialties 

RANDOLPH, MASSACHUSETTS 




There are many churches among the Nazarene people 
who would perhaps like to know just where they could 
secure a suitable organ for their church or Sunday-school, 
and possibly among those who hold open air services, 
who would prefer a folding organ. We have specialized 
in this type of instrument for twenty-five years, and 
have thousands of satisfied customers. Our prices are 
but little more than half you would pay to others, as 
we sell direct from factory to church, thus saving the 
dealer's or middle-man's profit. 

Can we be of service to you? If so, we shall be glad to 
furnish you with a catalogue and descriptive matter upon 
receipt of request from you. 

A. L. WHITE MFG. CO., 115 EnglewoodAve., Chicago ,111. 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 109 



KLEINS DRUG STORE, Inc. 

(Corner beale and hancock streets) 

Is the largest and best equipped Drug Store in Quincy 

Every courtesy is shown to all students of the E. N. C. 
Come In and Get Acquainted 



drugs toilet goods stationery 

Leading Brands of Candies 

Cynthia Sweets Durand's Foss Fish's 

Thompson Spa 
Sodas and Ice Cream 



OCTOBER 

Thursday, i — Memorable chapel service! We WILL 
"allow" the faculty to have a representative on the Student 
Council!!! 

Friday, 2 — The College Junior-Senior Social in the gym. 
Mr. Jenkins ventriloquizes. 

Saturday, 3 — "Some say it's gloomy. 
Some say it's sad. 
But if you have an umbrella 
It's not half so bad. 

Sunday, 4 — Truly a great day in Zion. The blessing of God 
is upon us individually and collectively. 

Tuesday, 6 — College girls scare Miss Dwineil by writing 
her that all is discovered. 

Wednesday, 7 — Nautilus Subscription Day. i,zo6 books 
subscribed. 

Thursday, 8 — The officers of the Young People's Society 
are elected. 

Friday, 9 — Evangelist Lum Jones discourses on fish in 
chapel service and then we have a boiled dinner. 

Saturday, 10 — Can you beat it? The earliest snowfall in 
twenty-six years! 

A candy pull in the dining hall. We're all "stuck-up." 

Sunday, 11 — Brother Esselstyn preaches in the evening. 

Monday, iz — Columbus Day. Hikers to the Blue Hills get 
back in time for supper "all tired out." 

Tuesday, 13 — Rev. Orval J. Nease tells us in chapel how he 
worked his way through college. Cheer up! If he did it we 
surely can. 



Thursday, 15 — 7 A.M. To go to class or to have our pictures 

taken, that is the 
question! 

Old Sol shows 
' ^£9;" his face and smiles 

qV\~ brightly all day. 

, o\- We "smile"' all 

-■1^ , day as the camera 
rY^A ' . r man "snaps" us in 
^jf]S^ picture after pic- 
ture, for this is 
Nautilus Picture 
Day. 

Friday, 16 — 
The first "open" 
Friday night. Some 
go to the Harvard- 
Oxford debate at 
Symphony Hall, 
others betake 
themselves on a 
hike. 

Saturday, 17 — Clarence Haas oils his floor! 

Sunday, 18 — Brother Jenkins leads the Y. P. Meeting. 

Monday, 19 — The photographer gathers up the ends of 
Picture day. Confusion in the library from 1 to 4 P.M. Oh! 
those long time exposures! 

Wednesday, zi — Missionary chapel service. Mrs. Millett 
told us about "Praying Hyde." 

Thursday, zz — The Nautilus Staff holds a meeting from 
9.30 to 11.30 P.M. 

Friday, 2.3 — More Nautilus pictures are taken. When will 
it end? 

Saturday, 14 — Betty Pillsbury cleans her room. 

Sunday, 2.5 — Good services at home. Pork chops for dinner. 

Monday, z6 — Doris Gale's birthday. 

Tuesday, 17 — Theodore Roosevelt's birthday! 




Page no 



The Nautilus 1026 



Compliments of 
P. J. KING 

First Class Shoe Repairing 

666 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

L. C. MERRILL 

Real Estate 

Wollaston, Mass. 



BALSOR'S MARKET 

Successors to Delory's Market 

Groceries, Meats, Vegetables, Fruits 

145 Beach Street, Wollaston, Mass. 
Telephone: granite 1845 



CRANE'S HOME BAKERY 

Have you tried our Cheese Buns and 
Butter Rolls? 

We are still making those delicious 
cream goods 

67 Beale Street 
Telephone: granite 5556-W 



EXPLICIT INFORMATION 

Miss Gale : I would like to meet every 
single member of the Evangelistic 
Association. 



A Young Gentleman much con- 
cerned : Is it all right to come if you are 



engaged? 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page in 



LADY'S FULLER PERSONAL SET 



In Drugs the prime essential is Quality 
In the Druggist it is Reliability 

When in need of Drugs, Stationery, 

Toilet Articles or any Drug Store Goods, 

we would be pleased to 

serve you 

QUALITY AND ACCURACY ALWAYS FIRST 
WITH US 

PLATNER'S PHARMACY 

N.J. Platner, Ph.G., Prop. 

662. Hancock Street, Corner Beach 
Wollaston, Mass. 




Not only are there Fuller personal sets for women, but for 
men as well. These are in addition to the many Fuller sets for 

household use. 

Fuller Brushes are sold only in the homes by the Fuller Man. 

Branch offices in over two hundred cities. 



FULLER BRUSHES 




ANDROS 
HARDWARE CO. 



Paints, Varnishes, 

Kitchenware, and 

Hardware 



"Seeds of All Kinds' ' 

608 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



When in Norfolk Downs 



EAT AT 



The Plaza Lunch 

2.3 Billings Road 

Good food at all hours 
Try us and be convinced 



Page 112. 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 




The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 113 



TALBOT'S 

Clothiers — Hatters — Furnishers 
TALBOT-QUINCY, Inc. 

I387 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY, MASS. 



FORESIGHT 
is giving serious thought to your eyes now, before advancing years dim your vision. 

Neglect of slight defects of vision causes much of the eye discomforts of advanced 
years. 

Every pair of eyes is deserving of the greatest care and skill in eye examination 
and the best quality in lenses. 

I specialize in eye examination and fitting glasses. My charges are fair and 
consistent with the service I am able to render after thirtv years of experience. 

RALPH H. WIGHT 
Optometrist and Optician 
47 Winter Street Boston, Mass. 



A New Science 



MODERN LAUNDERING 
The laundering of fabrics is as scientific a 
process as the weaving of them. Each bundle 
of laundry work contains a different problem, 
each fabric demands a certain temperature of 
water, a particular method of washing to obtain 
the best results. 

The Old Colony makes a business of 

solving every washing problem. 

Let us solve yours, today! 



INVITATION: We take pleasure in inviting the students of Eastern Nazarene College to visit our 
modern and scientific plant. 




Page 114 The Nautilus 1926 



Compliments of 

WHITE BROS. 
83 Brook Street, Atlantic, Mass. 



Dependability 

Doesn't that cover the requirements of business? You may be sure that our coal and 
the service behind it is dependable. It is the quality you purchase, not what you pay 
for coal per ton. Try our fuel, and its sterling qualities and real worth will bear 

upon you. 

QUINCY COAL CO. 

156 Penn St., Quincy, Mass. Telephone: granite 0047 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 115 



OCTOBER — Continued 

Wednesday, z8 — Missionary pledges made in chapel, $900. 

Thursday, 2.9 — Contest launched between the Herculeans 
and Trojans for the securing of the Nautilus subscription 
money. 

Friday, 30 — Ghosts and Goblins! The girls give the 
Faculty and Y.M.A.A. a Hallowe'en Social. 

Saturday, 31 — President Nease finds Miss Jones eating 
chestnuts in the library. 

NOVEMBER 

Sunday, 1 — Professor Gardner preaches in the evening. 

David Diaz puts his head through the window. Glass is 
broken, head is tough! 

Monday, 2. — Rev. Theodore Eisner and wife are at chapel. 

Tuesday, 3 — College Life Editor is confined to his room 
with the mumps. 

Wednesday, 4 — Policeman walks home with Miss Dwinell. 

Thursday, 5 — Mr. Ames is having a "swell" time! 

Friday, 6 — First game between the College and Academy 
teams. Score 36-14, favor of College. 

Saturday, 7 — Professors Nease and Gardner attend the 
football game at Quincy. 

Sunday, 8 — President Nease preaches in the morning. Six 
at altar. 

Monday, 9 — Sixty-five new second-hand chairs arrive for 
chapel. 

Tuesday, 10 — Brother Ruth gives Bible Reading in chapel 
service. 

Wednesday, n — Armistice Day. We go to school. 

Thursday, 12. — Found! In Ray Hagerman's bureau drawer 

a lady's handbag and vanity case. 

Friday, 13 — Sounds unlucky, doesn't it? But we manage to 
survive. 



Saturday, 14 — All day of prayer. Brother Ruth is glad to 
get back after nine hours away. 

Sunday, 15 — Three services, wonderful sermons. We all 
hate to have Brother Ruth leave. God bless him! 

Monday, 16 — Classes again, and still again George Rogers 
has a headache. 

Tuesday, 17 — Rev. J. W. Lowman and wife are here for 
chapel service. Preaching on the "Unpardonable Sin". 
Terrific conviction is on and souls run to the mourners' bench. 
The service lasts till 3.40 P.M. 

Wednesday, 18 — Letters from missionaries read in chapel. 
All our missionaries are going to be written to by us. 

Thursday, 19 — Herculeans and Trojans make a desperate 

effort to finish the 
Dormitory. Her- 
culeans win be- 
fore 5.00 P. M. 
Everything paint- 
ed orange. 

Friday, 20 — 
The band plays as 
the victorious 
Herculeans be- 
decked with 
colors march into 
chapel. Trojans 
are good losers. 

Saturday, 2.1 — 
Roy Bowers can't 
study! Christmas 
five weeks away 
and he's going 
home to see his 
wife and son. 



k 1 




r\e&J Gaj\\e 



College Students' Supplies 

College Text Books 

Candy 



Try our line of 
BREAD, CAKE, & PASTRY 

Fresh every day 



WILLIAM A. MILLETT 



BILLY the BAKER 
137 Beach Street, Wollaston, Mass. 



Telephone 

GRANITE 39O 



Residence 

GRANITE 579I 



F. W. HIBBETT & SONS 

Frank W. Hibbett, Proprietor 

Plumbing, Heating and Sheet Metal Work 

5 Maple Street 
Quincy, Mass. 



ROSE BOWL CAFE 

IDA M. FRIEND 

IF WE COOK WHAT YOU EAT, 

YOU'LL AGREE IT'S A TREAT. 1 

ALL HOME COOKING 

Orders taken for Home-Made Pies and Cakes 

647a, Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: Granite 5632. -J 



Page n6 The Nautilus 1926 



Compliments of 

GRANITE CITY ICE CO. 

East Milton, Mass. 



Telephone: granite 5908-W 
HANCOCK BEAUTY SHOP 

Shampooing and Marcel Waving 
QUINCY Violet Ray Treatment and Inecto 



Y. M. C. A. 



Dyeing 

Open Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday 
Evenings 

654 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



W. T. ARNOLD ART STORE 

Picture Frames and Framing 
Upholstering and Upholstery Goods 

Antique Furniture and Cabinet Hardware Cabinet Work of all kinds 

Curtains and Window Screens 

Best Work at lowest prices Work guaranteed 

References given and required 

14 Revere Road, Quincy, Mass. 

Business Men's Lunch 

EVERY NOON 
IE LIBERTY SHOE STORES Menu Changed Every Bay 

14x9 Hancock Street Special Blue Plate Lunch Every Evening 

Special Breakfast Every Morning 

THOMPSON'S CAFE 
City Square 



Quincy, Mass. 



Th 



Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 117 



MISS MARION FARWELL 
Magazine Specialist 

to Briggs Street Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 0643 

Always at your service to order for you 
any magazines or club of 
magazines at lowest rates 



Compliments of 

Chet's Tire Shop 

688 a Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



F. L. MAYNARD CO. 

Beef, Lamb, Veal, and Poultry 

Schools, Camps, Clubs, and Dining Halls 

15-16-17 Blackstone Market 
76 Blackstone Street 

Boston 

Telephone: Richmond 1143 — 12.44 



Telephone: Jamaica 43 18 

Orders Promptly Delivered 

CHARLES M. CLOUGHER 

PROPRIETOR 

Brooklyn Egg Case and Butter Tub 
Supply Co. 

Butter Tubs and Egg Cases 
supplied at short notice 

18810 104th Avenue Hollis, N.Y. 



"SHE ASPIRES" 

Stella May Gardner: Chet, do you 
know why you are so thin? 

Chet: No, why? 

Stella May: Because you are in love. 
People that are in love are always thin. 

(A few minutes lateri) 

Chet : Stella May, would you like to 
be thin? 

Stella May : You just bet I would. 

"WORD TO THE WISE" 
In European History class, Professor 
Cowdrey: Close your books and open 
your intellects. 

ANGELIC TENDENCIES 
Virgil Hoover aspires to lofty alti- 
tudes. He ascends the hill where the 
Prospect is good for seeing an Angel (1) 
or two. We wonder to what extent he 
receives Angelic revelations. 



WOLLASTON 
RADIO— ELECTRIC SHOP 

33 5 a Newport Avenue 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Full line of Sporting Goods 
10% discount to E.N .C. Students 

Open Evenings 
Telephone: granite 4571-M 



ROBBINS 

PAINTING DECORATING 

WALL PAPERS 

10 Cliveden St. 
Quincy, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 032.6 — 6541 



Page ii I 



The Nautilus 1926 




10 State Street, Boston 



In the long run 



you and your friends will prize the portrait that looks like you — your truest self, 
free from stage effects and little conceits. It is in this "long run" Photography that 
PURDY success has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one cannot laugh at or cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride protect your photographic self by having 
PURDY make the portraits. 

PURDY 
145 Tremont Street, Boston 

Official Photographer 
Eastern Nazarene College 
Nautilus 1926 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 119 



JAMES P. CAHILL 

Men' s and Boys' Furnishings 

Cor. Beale Street and Greenwood Ave. 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite Z398-M 



JAMES P. CAHILL 

Successor to 

C. F. FOSTER 

Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring 

51 Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 1.^^-M. 



BLACKER & SHEPARD COMPANY 

LUMBER 
''EVERYTHING FROM SPRUCE TO MAHOGANY" 

409 Albany Street, Boston, Mass. 
Telephone: beach 5400 

Branch Yard: Squantum Street, Norfolk Downs 
Telephone: granite 1090 
Represented by 

Herbert S. Barker, Vice-President 



RICKER PRINTING CO. 

Printers — Binders 
Stationers 

FIRST CLASS PRINTING A SPECIALTY 

2.x Brook Street, Wollaston, Mass. 
Telephone: granite 3149 



DINING HALL HUMOR 

Mr. Deware: The correct posture at 
the table is feet directly under your 
butter pad. 

Mrs. Gould: (ringing bell after 
breakfast): Are there any announce- 
ments? 

Mr. Randall: (bashfully): Er-er- 
please may I be excused? 



Mr. Randall at dinner: Mr. Hager- 
man, is there any piece of liver up there 
that I could possibly chew? 

Hagerman: I don't know, I haven't 
tried this yet. 

Announcement — After Dinner, 
October it: 

Will all the young men who are 
planning to take Miss Gardner on the 
hike this afternoon kindly meet in the 
parlor at 1.00 p.m. 

(There must have been a sad con- 
fusion either before or after.) 

AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT 

After supper Roy Bowers announces 
that he sat at a very unusual table. It 
had five legs, two (F) feet, and one 
(H)hand. 



Page ixo 



The Nautilus 1926 



"Say it with Flowers" 

LEONARD'S FLOWER SHOP 
H. Becker, Mgr. E. J. Leonard, Prop. 
31 Beale Street, Wollaston 

Floral Designs a Specialty 



JAMES KITTRIDGE 
Hair Dressing Parlor 

Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Faithful Service 
E. N. C. Students Welcome 



SMALLEY-TERHUNE SHOE CO. 

For Appearance — 

For Comfort — 

For Economy 

wear our shoes 
5% Discount for E. N. C. Students 

Newport Ave. Opp. Depot 

Wollaston, Mass. 



YULE'S GARAGE 
C. B. Yule and Son, Props. 

Riekenbacker Sales and Service 

Willard Storage Batteries 
Auto Storage and Accessories 

676-678 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Office Telephone: granite 5513 
Repair Shop: granite z.060 



Compliments of 

E. B. FINN, INC. 

Quincy' s Leading Stationer 

1395 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mass. 



BLACK CAT SHOPPE 

Gifts — Greeting Cards 

School Supplies 

Ice Cream — Candy 

688 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



DONAHER'S 

Mens and Boys' Store 

Clothiers — Hatters — Furnishers 

1559 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mass. 



Cash and Carry Prices 



Free Delivery 



JERSEY BUTTER CO. 

Grocery Creamery 

6 Beale Street, Wollaston 

Telephone: granite 52.13 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 12.1 



SECOND BLESSING SONGS on PHONOGRAPH RECORDS and in SHEET MUSIC 

Compositions of Evangelist E. Arthur Lewis 

SEE last issue of each month in the Herald of Holiness for complete list and prices or write for list. 

Be sure and get the Wm. Jennings Bryan Records. 

GET THE 

NEW — Anti-Evolution Song — Has already attracted wide attention. 

SONGS — No. 44 If I Came From a Monkey. In sheet music, Z5 cents each. 

GET IT AT ONCE 
Kept on the Firing Line 

(Mate to Keep Me on the Firing Line.) 
Farewell Father, I am Dying 
Holiness Hallelujah Chorus 
Carnal Menagerie 
Jonah 

Religious Swanee River Song — Holiness revision 
The Wondrous Story 

How Tedious and Tasteless the Hours — Holiness revision. 
Scatter Seeds of Kindness — Holiness revision 
— TEN — SONGS for $1.00 — Z5 cents each, 4 for 50 cents. 



No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



35 

43 
36 

37 
38 



No. 39 
No. 41 
No. 41 
No. 40 
ALL 



Rev. E. Arthur Lewis, 2.07 E. Marquette Rd., Chicago, 111. 



NOVEMBER — Continued 

Sunday, 2.1 — President Nease preaches in the morning and 
Professor Gardner in the evening. 

Monday, 13 — We are too excited to study. Three days and 
then vacation. 

Tuesday, 2.4 — Miss Gilbert goes home to Lisbon, Ohio. We 
miss her. 

The Green Book is out. 

Wednesday, 15 — Edwin Rush — Ruth Macintosh, John 
Poole — Mildred Belmont, all former E.N.C. students. 
Married by Rev. E. T. French. 

Thursday, i£ — Thanksgiving Day! Every one is thankful 
that there is enough for all. 

Friday, 2.7 — Hot dogs for dinner! A change from yesterday. 

Saturday, 2.8 — The lights are off" from 3 to 5 .40 P. M. But we 
have supper on time. We envy the students who have gone 
home. 

Sunday, Z9 — The day before the end — of vacation. 

Monday, 30 — Haas and Anderson get back from Berwick, 
Pa., where they have been in a ten-day's meeting. 

DECEMBER 

Tuesday, 1 — Dr. H. F. Reynolds comes unexpectedly and 
speaks in chapel. 

Wednesday, 2 — Snap Contest. Virgil Hoover and Lurla 
Dwinell, captains. Who will win? 



Thursday, 3 — Miss McKay, of the White Cross Italian 
Mission in West Quincy, speaks in chapel. A stirring message. 

Friday, 4 — Breseean Literary program in the evening. 
President Nease gives a pertinent address on Literary Society 
etiquette. 

Saturday, 5 — It is still raining! Well, let 'er rain. 

Sunday, 6 — Paul Loeffler brings his mother and girl to 
church. 

Monday, 7 — President Nease fails to appear for Logic class. 
What can the matter be? 

Wednesday, 9 — Dr. Chapman speaks in chapel. His theme 
is Wisdom. We need it. It's a scarce article around here. 

Thursday, 10 — Fire Chief James Young introduced to us 
the organization of the E.N.C. Fire Department. 

Friday, 11 — The Trojans banquet the Herculeans in the 
evening. 

Sunday, 13 — Pastor Angell holds forth morning and eve- 
ning on Sabbath observance. 

Monday, 14 — Girls announce penalty for loss of Snap 
Contest to the defeated boys. 

Tuesday, 15 — Mrs. Loeffler tells some of her experiences 
among the Jews in New York City. Very thrilling indeed! 

Wednesday, 16 — Arthur Morse is a busy man — in the 
Nautilus room. You should see him cut out paper dolls. 

Thursday, 17 — Miss Freda Hayford speaks of her work in 
Vermont. Our Vermonters are happy and quiet all at once. 




WHATEVER YOUR QUESTION 

Be it the pronunciation of vitamin or marquisette or soviet, the spelling 

of a puzzling word — the meaning of overhead, novocaine, etc., this 

"SUPREME AUTHORITY" 

WEBSTER'S NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY 

contains an accurate, final answer. 407,000 words, x,700 pages, 6,000 illustrations. 

Constantly improved and kept up to date. Copyright 192.4. Regular and India Paper 

Editions. Write for specimen pages, prices, etc. Cross Word Tux^le workers should be 

equipped with the New International, for it is used as the authority by puzzle editors. 

FREE Pocket Maps if you name this paper. 

G. & C. Merriam Company, Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 



Page nx ^ h e Nautilus 1926 

Compliments of 

GEORGE D. EMERSON 

Wholesale Grocers 
BOSTON 

Largest Distributors in New England of High Grade Fruits 
and Vegetables in Number Ten Cans 

HENRY ELSNER 

Insurance that Covers 

WHERE 
ANY KIND 

COMPANY 

IOO WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK 

Tele-phone: beekman 7140 



WILLIAM A. DOE CO. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Beef j Porkj Lambj Vealj Poultry 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, OILS, OLIVES, SELEX JAMS, PICKLES, FISH 

FANEUIL HALL MARKET, BOSTON 
Main office, 34 Merchants Row 

Telephone: congress 70x0, all departments 



T h e Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 1x3 



TYPEWRITERS 

ADDING MACHINES 

All Styles All Kinds All Models 




Both new and factory rebuilt 



Note 

Deferred monthly 
payments if desired 




Authorized Dealers 
Remington, Corona 
and Underwood 
Portables 




Write or phone' for 

circulars and latest 

price list 



CoronA 

The Personal Writing Machine 



Machines Rented 



postern ZEppetortter Company 

42. High Street (Corner Federal Street,^) Boston 
Telephone: liberty 862.2. 

"One minute from South Station" 



Page 114 



The Nautilus 1926 



WILSON'S 
TOPICAL and TEXTUAL INDEX 

FOR 

Preachers and Teachers 

By this system, index the best you 
read in books, and file clippings. 

It is almost automatic, and is inex- 
pensive. 

Highly commended. Circulars 

WILSON INDEX CO. 
East Haddam Connecticut 

Telephone: granite 1995-M 

THE VALLEE PRESS 
Printers — Stationers 

95 D Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Stationery 



Office Supplies 



LET US SAVE YOU MONEY! 

TT7"E supply many of the largest institutions in New 
England with Mattresses, Blankets, Cots, and Pillows, 
and are prepared to save you many dollars on your require- 
ments, whether for one outfit or a thousand. 

Let us quote you prices on 
Mattresses Outdoor Clothing 

Blankets Camping Supplies 

Army Cots Army and Navy Goods 

THE MERCHANDISE SALES CO. 

37 Essex Street, Boston, Mass. 



'Reliability is our WATCHWORD' 

FRED MAYER 
Jeweler and Optician 



59 Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



WOLLASTON DEPARTMENT STORE 

''The Store of Quality , Service 
and Satisfaction" 

Ladies', Gents' and Children's 
Furnishings 

Infants' Wear 

19 Beale Street opp. Masonic Temple 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Granite, 6146 -M 



Open Evenings 



COMER CLOTHING 

Suits, Overcoats 
Rain Coats 

Low Prices and High Quality 

SEE 

D. M. MacDONALD 

E. N. C. 

OR 

16 Story Street Cambridge, Mass. 



Compliments of 



THE IDEAL MACHINE CO. 

MAKERS OF LACE TIPPING MACHINES 



589 Essex Street 
Lynn, Mass. 



THE GREENLEAF SWEET SHOP 

HIGH GRADE, HOME-MADE CANDIES 
AND BON BONS 

T. H. Anostos, Prop. 
P. Anostos, Mgr. 

Quincy, Mass. 
Telephone: granite 4910 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 1x5 



Compliments of 



White Rose Bread 



BRODY BROS. 

Merchant Tailors 

HIGH GRADE 
CLEANSING AND DYEING 
PRESSING AND REPAIRING 

8 Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Young Sally's Barber Shop 



THREE EXPERT BARBERS 



Special Attention to 
Ladies and Children 



694 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

GEORGE HITCHINGS 

BUILDER and Developer of High Class Homes 

2.8 Janet Road 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 6858 



Page 12.6 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



City Square 



GRANITE TRUST CO. 

Quincy, Mass. 

GRANITE X500 GRANITE 5ZOO 



Opp. Depot, Wollaston 



oldest strongest largest 

Commercial Bank in the Granite City 




McMURRAY'S SPA 

Pure Fruit Ice Cream — Our Own Make 

Russell's Chocolates 

School Supplies — Novelties — Toys 

139 Beach Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 2.354 



SUIT OR OVERCOAT 

Ready to wear 

or made to measure 



$23 



C\f\ We want to call your attention 
• uu to the 

Reduction in Price 



This season our clothes are even better than ever — Styles the latest — You can 
make your own selection — Workmanship and trimming guaranteed. Our shops have 
been unionized. Our business last year totaled $iz,i84,ii9.i3 Why ! Why! Why ! 

Because we treat every one as we would be treated — give service 
If you cannot come in, send a card or telephone Back Bay 10714 and a Nash repre- 
sentative will gladly call on you with samples. 

THE A. NASH CO. 

WHOLESALE TAILORS 
359 BoYLSTON STREET Subway car to Arlington Street BOSTON 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 12.7 




Page 12.8 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Compliments of -the 

ALHAMBRA CANDY SHOPS 

TWO STORES 

Makers of Fine Candies 

1371 and 15 13 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mass. 



L. W. GRANT 

women's, men's and children's 
furnishings 

319 Newport Avenue 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 2.172.-M 



Friday, 18 — "Give me a kiss," say all the young ladies to 
the young men. And if each young lady receives all she is 
entitled to, she will have at least 183 molasses kisses! i ^ 

Saturday, 19 — Arthur Morse sets sail for Virginia. "Carry 
me back, "Arthur. 

Sunday, 1.0 — Si 10 received in the special offering for the 
General Church deficit. 

Monday, 2.1 — Annual event! A number of couples go to 
hear the "Messiah" in Boston. 

Tuesday, 2.2. — A program is given by the Fine Arts Club in 
the evening in chapel. 

Wednesday, 2.3 — Christmas Chapel Service. The Chorus 
sings carols. Vacarion starts at noon! 





Saturday, x6 — Christmas tree in parlor. David Jenkins is 
Santa Claus. Entertainment by everybody. 

Sunday, 2.7 — Very cold and windy. Wouldn't we like to be 
home! 

Wednesday, 30 — Prayer meeting in the parlor. 

Thursday, 31 — Watch-night service io.oo-ii.oo. 



WOLLASTON SPA 

Fruitj Vegetables 
Home-made Candies ■, Sodas, Soft Drinks, Ice Cream 

THE BEST IN TOWN THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD 

9 Beale Street, Wollaston, Mass. 
Telephone: granite 2.165 



HANCOCK 
SHOE REPAIRING SHOP 

AND SHINE PARLOR 

653 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Passero Bros., Prop. 

Telephone: granite 3934-R 



BUTLER'S LUNCH 

658 Hancock Street 

A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Quick Service 



Also BUTLER'S SEA GRILL 
308 Wollaston Beach 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 1x9 



H 

I 

L 

L 

I 

A 
R 
D 



G 

L 
A 

S 
S 

H 
O 
U 

s 

E 



±1 Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Cooperation 



33 Billings Road 
Norfolk Downs, Mass. 



E 
A 
S 
T 
E 
R 
N 

N 
A 

Z 
A 
R 

E 
N 

E 

C 
O 

L 
L 
E 
G 

E 



JANUARY 

Sunday, 3 — Oh well! All things must have an end. School 
again to morrow. 

Monday, 4 — Students coming back from the Christmas 
vacation. Too much competition from parlor to keep library 
open in evening. 

Tuesday, 5 — Back to classes again. Doesn't it seem great! 

Wednesday, 6 — Professor Cowdrey takes us to Africa with 
him for a while. 

Friday, 8 — Basket ball game between College and 
Academy. Score 19-15. College wins. Skating party after 
game. 

Sunday, 10 — Brother Angell preaches on the dress ques- 
tion. 

The cat and dog meet in the dining hall at dinner time while 
we sing, "There shall be showers of blessing". 

Wednesday, 13 — First "curtain lectures". 

Thursday, 14 — Just another one of those spontaneous 
chapel services when the Lord comes and changes the order. 

Friday, 15 — B.L.S. gives a radio program. Unique, enjoy- 
able! Mr. Ames goes to sleep while Fraulein Dwinell sings in 
German, "Sing me to sleep". 

Saturday, 16 — Birthday of two noted persons: 
ELLA MAY STRICKLAND 
JAMES A. YOUNG 

Sunday, 17 — We shiver outside the dining-room door. 
Please let us in! 



Definition of the Law of Gravitation found on an examina- 
tion paper: Every two persons in the universe attract each 
other with a force that is directly proportional to the product 
of the masses and inversely proportional to the square of the 
distance between them. 

Betty Pillsbury 



Washington-Philadelphia 
District Camp Meeting 

LESLIE, MARYLAND 

The camp meeting grove is located 
one mile from North East, Maryland, 
which is on the main line of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad from Philadelphia to 
Washington. Just half way between 
Philadelphia and Baltimore. 

Beautiful Grove Fine Pure Water 

No Mosquitoes 

WORKERS 
Dr. C. E. Hardy of Nashville, Tenn., 
Rev. J. T. Maybury, District Superin- 
tendent, and the Pastors of the District. 

Permanent Date: Second Friday in 
August 

Business Manager: Rev. J.N. Nielson, 
173 McKinley St., Bristol, Penn. 



Page 130 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 




Say Boys! Take your girls to 



THE LILAH TEA SHOPPE 



The perfect way to end a Friday evening is with an E.N.C. Special, a Hot Fudge or 

Hot Butterscotch Sundae 



13 Beale Street 



Wollaston, Mass. 



APPEAL TO THE IMAGINATION 

Professor Angell, while preaching, takes his liberty. He 
says, "Let us just imagine Brother Young (Samuel) is married 
and settled in a cozy little home!" 

Brother Young: M-m-m, when dreams come true. 

Missionary speaking to a group of students : 

"Now I am going to take you all to Africa and leave you 
there." 

Art Editor in stage whisper to Editor-in-Chief: 

"Oh, we can't stay, we won't get that engraving off 
tomorrow." 

UNSPEAKABLE DIFFICULTY 

Miss Phillips returns from So. Elliot speechless. 
Sympathetic Fellow Student: What's the matter, Miss 
Phillips — do you have a bad cold? 

Reply: Oh, I'm simply struggling for utterance. 




THE BETTER HALF 
Miss Phillips : I would like to meet all 
the College senior girls right after 
dinner. 

Miss Gale: What about the College 
senior boy si 

"NUFSED" 

Heard in dining hall. 

Miss Angell : If you boys want any 
hearts you'll have to get your orders in 
early. 



GAS — the ultimate fuel ! 



It is the only form of heat that can meet all the requirements of a perfect 

fuel. 

It is a clean, immediate, flexible and economical fuel. 

It will warm a cup of milk or melt the sturdiest iron bar. 

Its use as a fuel has grown enormously because of its great convenience and 

adaptability. 

"If it's done with heat, you can do it better with Gas." 

CITIZENS' GAS LIGHT COMPANY 

7 Granite Street, Quincy 
Telephone: granite 0818 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 131 



Jf trst Cfourcf) of tfje j£a?arem 

i34 Franklin Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

REV. G. E. WADDLE, Pastor 
Residence: 189 Upland Road. Telephone: porter 0059-W 



^>unbap i£>erbtces 



IO.OO A.M. 
IO.3O A.M. 



Prayer Meeting 6.15 p.m. N. Y. P. S. Meeting 

Preaching 7.00 p.m. Preaching 

11.15 p.m. Sunday School 
E. R. Blaisdell Jas. F. Randall, 

Superintendent Assistant Superintendent 

Prayer Meeting Tuesday and Friday, 7.30 p.m. 

A CORDIAL INVITATION AND A GLAD WELCOME IS 
EXTENDED TO EVERY ONE TO ATTEND OUR MEETINGS 




Holiness Unto the Lord 

Cfmrrf) of tfje J?a?arene 

First Street, Lowell, Mass. 

A Church Spiritual, Fundamental, Different 

FEATURES OF INTEREST 

Strong Departmental Church School, Old-Fashioned Class Meetings 

with Godly Leaders, Splendid chorus of Twenty Voices, Pastor and 

Workers call promptly and regularly at the homes 

E. E. MARTIN, Pastor ARLETTA MARTIN, Asst. Pastor 

Miss Ella Leona Gale, A.A.G.O., Director of Music Miss Edith Cove, Pianist 



THE 
JOHNSON DRUG CO. 

Newsdealers and Stationers 
Baseball Sullies 

93-95 Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



BEACH TAILORING CO. 

ladies' and gents' 
TAILORS 

FIRST CLASS CLEANING 

PRESSING DYEING REFINISHING AND 

REMODELING 

145 Beach Street 

Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite i68x-R 



JANUARY 

Tuesday, 19 — First fire drill. Student Council meets at 
9.30 P.M. 

Wednesday, 2.0 — Max Powers very ill with pneumonia. 
Special prayer for him. 

Friday, 2.2. — The Y.M.A.A. entertains the Y.W.A.A. with 
asocial in the gym. 

Saturday, 2.3 — Old Testament History students are catch- 
ing up on back work, especially the girls. 

Sunday, 14 — Two good sermons by Brother Angell. 
Profitable altar service. 

Monday, 2.5 — Final exams are upon us! Let us rise and 
sing, "Never give up". 

Tuesday, 2.6 — Some finish their tests. 

Wednesday, 2.7 — "Micky" gets his front teeth knocked 
out. The ice was too hard. 

Friday, 2.9 — Examinations cease. First semester comes to a 
close. 

Mrs. Gould lectures all the couples for talking in the hall. 

Sunday, 31 — Brother Angell demonstrates how to sur- 
mount difficulties. He mounts a chair which falls beneath 
him and he lands on his back on the floor, shouting "Amen" 
however. 

FEBRUARY 

Monday, 1 — Miss Jones and Miss Hand paper their room. 

Tuesday, 2. — Registration. Several new students arrive. 
Sleighing party in evening. 



Page 131 



The Nautilus 1926 



Joljn Uealeg dottrel} of tlje Nazarene 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Corner Bushwick Avenue and Grove Street 

For years God's children, led by Dr. C.J. Fowler, Howard Hoople, Phineas Bresee 
and the local brethren and sisters, have cried to God for 

A CENTER OF HOLY FIRE 

Now we have been able to procure this property valued (with proposed addition) at one 
hundred fifty thousand dollars ($150,000) . It is unexcelled for location and is reached 
by the main arteries of traffic — elevated, subway and boulevard. This church in the 

GREATEST CITY IN THE WORLD 

is a better investment than a monument in a cemetery. Scores of Christians of all 
denominations should be interested in the spread of the full 
salvation message in this metropolis 
Mail your check toward the payments on this property to the Pastor. 

When in Brooklyn 
Do not fail to visit this great Holiness Center 
Tuesday Afternoon Holiness Meeting Wednesday Prayer Meeting 



Sunday Services 



Rev. A. Gordon Crockett, Fast or 



999 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



3fl|e Sftrst (Jljurctj of \\\i Jfazamte 

Cor. Chestnut Street and Storey Avenue 
Lynn, Massachusetts 

Rev. Earl T. French, Pastor 



Telephone: breakers 5742. 



10 Storey Avenue 




Service Schedule 

Sunday Morning Worship . 

Sunday School . 

Y.P.S 

Revival Service . 

Week Night Class Meeting, Tuesday 

Prayer Meeting, Thursday 



10.30 A.M. 
IZ.15 P.M. 

6.00 P.M. 

7.OO P.M. 

7.3O P.M. 
7.3O P.M. 



"Holiness becometh Thine House, Lord, forever" 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 



Page 133 




WOLLASTON CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

College Chapel 

' ' THE STUDENTS' CHURCH' ' 

Services 
Sunday Sunday School . 

Morning Worship . 

Y.P.S 

Evangelistic Service 
Wednesday Prayer Meeting . 

Rev. E. E. Angell, Pastor 
Telephone: Granite 0682.-J 136 Prospect Avenue 

A cordial invitation to these services is extended to all 



IO.OO A.M. 
II.OO A.M. 

7.OO P.M. 

7.45 P.M. 

7.OO P.M. 



When in our vicinity 

VISIT THE 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Garfield Place and Ocean Avenue 
East Rockaway, New York 

Rev. Paul S. Hill, Pastor 



Compliments of 

North Hill Church of the Nazarene 
Y. P. S. 

North Howard St. and Tallmadge Ave. 
Akron, Ohio 

H. B. MACRORY, Minister 
77 East York Street Phone: Portage 1757 - J 



When in New York City Come Worship 
With Us 

"The Gospel in Poiver" 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Cor. 95th Ave. and 108th St. 

Richmond Hill, Boro of Queens 

New York City 

Rev. Howard P. Jett, Pastor 
Telephone: Virginia 6135 

Services: Sunday and Wednesday Eve. 



PEOPLE'S CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Judson Square, Malden, Mass. 

"The Friendly Church" 




Sunday — Morning Worship 
Sunday School 
Y.P.S. 

Evangelistic Service 

Week-night — Class meeting, Wed. 

Prayer meeting, Fri. 



10.30 a.m. 
ii. 10 p.m. 

6.00 p.m. 

7.00 p.m. 

7.30 p.m. 

7.30 p.m. 



REV. K. HAWLEY JACKSON, Minister 
8 High Street Telephone: Maiden 3190 

LEROY D. PEAVEY, Sunday School Superintendent 

A church for all people, where the services are evangelistic 

the year round 



Page 134 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Hair Dressing Parlor 

Catering to Men's, Women's 
and Children's 

HAIR CUTTING 
also Shampooing, etc. 

GIDEON ROGERS 

i^5 Newport Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

HARRY KURLANSKY 

Custom Tailor and Clothier 

Men's Furnishings and Ready-to- Wear 
Clothing 

Cleansing and Repairing 

1466 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mass. 



McKENZIE'S 
3 Temple Street Quincy, Mass. 

Tele-phone: granite 5 131 

Quincy Agent for 

Remington Portable Typewriter 
Machines Rented — Bought — Sold 
Stationery and Office Supplies 



WOLLASTON DAIRY LUNCH 

Quick Service 
first class meals 

68 Beale Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



FEBRUARY 

Wednesday, 3 — Chapel at 8.00 A.M. Classes convene and we 
get tremendous assignments. 

Thursday, 4 — Very severe snowstorm. All trains don't go. 
We are snowbound. 

Friday, 5 — Athenian Literary Society in the evening. 

Saturday, 6 — Some students find employment shoveling 
snow and delivering laundry. 

Sunday, 7 — President Nease preaches a doctrinal sermon. 
Professor Angell stirs us with a message in evening. Several 
seekers and finders. 

Monday, 8 — Rev. Tom Brown of Beverly speaks in chapel. 

Tuesday, 9 — Breseean officers are installed. Student Coun- 
cil meeting. Freddie Shields is out visiting us. 

Wednesday, 10 — Another bad snow storm all day. A 
Vermonter goes snowshoeing. 

Thursday, n — Max Powers is out and goes home. 

Friday, 12. — Miss Sears gives a piano and expression 
recital. 

Saturday, 13 — Miss Sears talks by phone with her folks in 
Oklahoma. 

Sunday, 14 — Valentine Day. Whence come all these 
candied protestations of affection? 



Monday, 15 — Professor Angell does not meet his classes. 

Tuesday, 16 — Census taken in chapel. Then the rules are 
read to us. How could we help but forget; there are so many? 

"Merry" and Grace break up again. It's serious. 

Thursday, 18 — The Lyceum has a debate of much interest 
on Capital Punishment. 

Friday, 19 — Fried eggs for breakfast!! 

Sunday, 11 — Fried eggs on toast for breakfast!! What's 
going to happen? 

Monday, 2.2. — Holiday. Students away preaching. 

Tuesday, Z3 — We must forget yesterday, and study again. 

Wednesday, 2.4 — Missionary quotations in chapel. 

Thursday, 2.5 — Rev. W. E. Smith of Cambridge reads some 
original poems in chapel. We all want him to come again. 

Friday, z6 — Clarence Haas gets his Nautilus work finished 
and goes to the hospital for a vacation and rest. 

Saturday, -lj — George Rogers eats eight frankforts for 
dinner. He buys a piece of candy after dinnerfor good measure. 

Sunday, x8 — Young People's Rally. Three services. 
Sermons by Tom Greene, Professor Gardner, and Samuel 
Young. 



The Nautilus 1926 



Page 135 



"It is our pleasure from time to time to furnish the 

Eastern Nazarene College with the Celebrated Bertha 

Egg Coal from our Rachel Mine at Rachel, 

West Virginia, in the Marion County 

Low Sulphur Gas Coal Field" 

Bertha Consumers 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



NORFOLK HABERDASHERY 

"The small store with the BIG VALUES" 

19 Billings Road 
Norfolk Downs, Mass. 

To all students of E. N. C. we will give 
10% discount on all purchases 



We are equipped to render a shoe 
repairing service of the better sort 

Over twenty years' experience enables us to give 

the best in workmanship and materials 

at moderate prices 

EDWARD J. O'BRIEN 

116 Rawson Rd., near Beach Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephone: granite 5889-M 



SMITH BROTHERS 



TAILORS 



303 Newport Avenue, Wollaston, Mass. 
Telephone: granite 3711 



Page 136 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



New England District Camp Meeting 

North Reading, Mass. 
June X5th to July 5 th, 192.6 



Rev. C. H. Babcock, D.D. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Evangelist 



Dr. R. T. Williams, D.D. 
Dallas, Texas 

Evangelist 



Prof. C. C. Rinebarger 
Olivet, 111. 

Song Director 



For accommodations write the secretary 
REV. E. T. FRENCH, 10 Storey Avenue, Lynn, Mass. 



MARCH 

Monday, i — A cold reception. 

Tuesday, z — It rains and the wind is never weary. 

Wednesday, 3 — Annual meeting of the trustees. Ice cream 
for supper. 

Thursday, 4 — Brother Millett takes charge of chapel 
service. 

Friday, 5 — Many go to the Young People's Convention in 
Maiden. Rev. Crockett of Brooklyn, N.Y., speaks in chapel. 

Saturday, 6 — President Nease and John Ames saw wood. 

Sunday, 7 — "Micky" goes home and his dad hands him a 
bill for three telephone calls to Wollaston, — $3. 

Monday, 8 — Unusual time of blessing in the young men's 
prayer meeting. 

Tuesday, 9 — Professor Munro speaks in chapel. Student 
Council has session. 

Wednesday, 10 — Mrs. Gould tells us about the W.F.M.S. 
and exhorts all the coming preachers to have one in their 
church. 



Friday, 12. — The Athenians present an Irish program. 
The campus loses an old pine tree. It will keep Stephen 
Wesley warm next winter. 

Sunday, 14 — Clarence Haas comes home from the hospital. 

Monday, 15 — Once more we have reports in chapel. But 
there is a strange lack of announcements. 
Irva Phillips loses her voice. 



"TELE" WOMAN 

Miss D. Allen: Professor Cowdrey 
told me to tell all the girls in the class 
that we would not meet tomorrow. I 
wonder why he didn't tell me to let the 
boys know. 

Mr. Randall: Why, he knew that if 
you told the girls it would spread to the 
boys very quickly. 



T h e Nautilus i g 2 6 Page i 37 




PINKHAM PRESS 

Printing and Advertising Service 

X86 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON 



ROBERT BURLEN & SON 

BOOKBINDERS 

Cloth and Leather Bindings 

i;6 Pearl Street 
Boston 



Page 138 



The Nautilus 1926 



COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY 




STANDARD 

ENGRAVING 
COMPANY^ 



designers, Qmgravers 

HALF-TONES LINE CUTS 
COLOR PLATES ELECTROTYPES 

1212 G Street, Northwest 
Franklin 170Q -Phones, Franklin 17 10 

USshinshn, ©. (2 



The Nautilus i g 2 6 Page i 39 

BABSON'S 

AT BABSON PARK 



The BABSON STATISTICAL ORGANIZATION publishes reports forecasting 
conditions in the Labor Market, Commodity Market, Production Field, Sales 
Territories, Individual Industries and Securities Markets — for thousands of the 
country's keenest investors, bankers and business men. 



The BABSON INSTITUTE trains for Business Leadership through its several 
divisions. 

(1) This advanced work may be taken either by Resident 
or Extension methods. The Resident School trains a limited 
number of men who are to assume responsibilities in the 
business and financial world. 

(2.) The Extension Division, for those who cannot arrange 
their time and finances to take the work of the Resident 
School, carries a similar training through correspondence — 
covering problems of Production, Finance, Distribution, 
and Management 

(3) The Elemental Extension Division includes certain 
Fundamental Courses and gives a strong summary of the 
essentials underlying permanent business success. These 
Fundamentals cover Economics, Accounting, Psychology, 
and Investing. 

Full details on any of the above mentioned work will be sent upon request. 



BABSON'S 

BABSON PARK, MASS. 

(Largest Statistical Community in the World) 

Leroy D. Peavey, Treasurer of E.N.C., is President of the Babson Statistical Organisation 

and an Incorporator of the Babson Institute 



Page 140 



The Nautilus 1 g 2 6 



Autograph 



s 



4 



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